The Holy Java

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Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

Notes from Troy Hunt’s Hack Yourself First workshop

Posted by Jakub Holý on June 17, 2015

Troy Hunt (@troyhunt, blog) had a great, very hands-on 2-day workshop about webapp security at NDC Oslo. Here are my notes.

Highlights – resources

Personal security and privacy

Site security

Breaches etc.

To follow

Read the rest of this entry »

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Most interesting links of June ’14

Posted by Jakub Holý on June 30, 2014

Recommended Readings

  • The emperor’s new clothes were built with Node.js – I know sadly little about Node.js but this goes against the hype and is thus interesting. So what does Node.js give us? Performance 1-5x slower than Java [like Clojure] according to the Benchmarks Game (contrary to other benchmarks with the opposite result as mentioned in the comments), use of a single CPU/core on our multi-cpu, multi-core machines, callback hell. At the same time, there are good non-blocking servers available in other languages (Clojure’s http-kit, Vert.x, etc.) (Update: From the comments it seems that f.ex. the “callback hell” situation is geting better with 0.11, fibers and other things I do not know anything about. Also Sandro has a nice anti-comment (No. 36).)
    The Node.js Is Bad Ass Rock Star Tech 5 min video is a nice companion 🙂
  • The Expert (Short Comedy Sketch)  (7 min) – you’ve certainly seen this one but I had to put it here; a young engineer is hammered into being an “Of course I can do it, I am an expert” ‘expert/consultant’ during a business meeting. Maybe you too have experienced a dialog with the business where your true expert opinion was crushed by the business people’s insistence on their absurd requirements?
  • Reset The Net – Privacy Pack – privacy-enhancing apps for PC/mobile
  • The Dyslexic Programmer (via Kent Beck) – interesting read about quite a different way to percieve and think about code, the advantages of IDEs.
  • It’s Here: Docker 1.0 => more stable from now on
  • Kent Beck: Learning About TDD: The Purpose of #isTDDDead – what is the purpose and value of TDD? Where are the limits of its value? “I recognize that TDD loses value as tests take longer to run, as the number of possible faults per test failure increases, as tests become coupled to the implementation, and as tests lose fidelity with the production environment.
  • Failure & Cake: A Guide to Spotify’s Psychology of Success – want to be innovative and successfull? Learn to embrace failure, nurture the “growth mindset” (failure as opportunity to improve) rather than the “fixed mindset” (I do not learn and every failure shows I have no value). Read this if you want your org to be a better place to work!

Non-tech

  • LSD — The Problem-Solving Psychedelic – I never knew that drugs could be used to something positive, with an incredible effect. Are you stuck with a tech/design/art problem? Try LSD! 🙂
  • The French are right: tear up public debt – most of it is illegitimate anyway – “Debt audits show that austerity is politically motivated to favour social elites. [..] 60% of French public debt is illegitimate” – not improving the lives of people but thos at power/rich. Time to reconsider this debt business and ways to make our system better?
  • Forbes: Why Financialization Has Run Amok – Wall Street is the kind and companies do everything to look better in its eyes – including giving up on opportunities. The might of the finance sector is destructive to our economy and distorts it, away from producing more value to making financial institutions richer, away from (value) creative activities to distributive ones. The article describes the problem and proposes a solution including limiting the size and leverage of banks, taxing financial transactions etc. Example of the effects: “[..] a cabal of senior IBM executives and the managers of some big investment firms got together and devised a five-year scheme—IBM’s Roadmap 2015—for increasing IBM’s earnings per share—and their own compensation—through measures that are not only increasing earnings per share but also steadily crippling IBM’s ability to innovate and compete [..]
  • Why Can’t We All Just Get Along? The Uncertain Biological Basis of Morality – very interesting criticism of “morality” that is mostly based on emotions and thus contradictory, a good argument for utilitarian morality [not that it hasn’t its own challenges]. According to the author, many conflicts are nor primarily due to divergent values but due to different interpretation of the reality and history (such as “who has right to this land?”). People suffer “[..] from a deep bias—a tendency to overestimate their team’s virtue, magnify their grievances, and do the reverse with their rivals.” “This is the way the brain works: you forget your sins (or never recognize them in the first place) and remember your grievances. [..] As a result, the antagonisms confronting you may seem mysterious, and you may be tempted to attribute them to an alien value system.” This leads to partial judgements that play very badly with another psychological feature – “Namely: the sense of justice—the intuition that good deeds should be rewarded and bad deeds should be punished.” “When you combine judgment that’s naturally biased with the belief that wrongdoers deserve to suffer, you wind up with situations like two people sharing the conviction that the other one deserves to suffer. Or two groups sharing that conviction. And the rest is history.” And “The most common explosive additive is the perception that relations between the groups are zero-sum—that one group’s win is the other group’s loss.” => “So maybe the first step toward salvation is to become more self-aware.
    When you’re in zero-sum mode and derogating your rival group, any of its values that seem different from yours may share in the derogation. Meanwhile, you’ll point to your own tribe’s distinctive, and clearly superior, values as a way of shoring up its solidarity. So outsiders may assume there’s a big argument over values. But that doesn’t mean values are the root of the problem.
    Those who choose not to act in the trolley dilemma[..] are just choosing to cause five deaths they won’t be blamed for rather than one death they would be blamed for. Not a profile in moral courage!

Clojure Corner

  • The Case for Clojure (video, 5 min) – a short video arguing for Clojure as a good solution language based on its simplicity, power, and fun factor. There are many claims and few facts (as dictated by the short length) but it might be interesting for somebody.
  • CrossClj.info – cross-reference of many OSS Clojure projects – find all uses of a fn across the projects, all fns with a given name, all projects using ring, … . Search by fn, macro, var, ns, prj.
  • The Weird and Wonderful Characters of Clojure – ‘A reference collection of characters used in Clojure that are difficult to “google”.’

Tools/Libs

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Most interesting links of May ’14

Posted by Jakub Holý on May 31, 2014

Recommended Readings

  • Monolith – from The Codeless Code – fables and koans for the SW engineer – the Monad monolth #Haskell #fun
  • http2 explained (pdf, 27 pages) – cons of http 1 (huge spec / no full impl., wasteful use of TCP <=> latency [x spriting, inlining, concatenation, sharding]) => make it less latency sensitive, fix pipelining (issue a req before previous one finished), stop the need for ever increasing # connections, remove/reduce optional parts of http. Http2 is binary; multiple “streams” over 1 connection => much less conns, faster data delivery; header/data compression; [predictive] resource pushing; . Inspired by SPDY. Chrome and Mozilla will only support it over TLS, yay! (see also Is TLS Fast Yet? [yes, it is]) Promise: faster, more responsive web pages & deprecation of http/1 workarounds => simplified web dev.

Special

  • exercism.io – crowd-sourced good code mentorship – get an exercise, implement it in any of the supported language(s), submit and get feedback, repeat; when finished, you too can comment the same excercise submitted by others while working on your next assignment. Languages include Clojure, JS, Scala, Python, Haskell, Go, Elixir, Java, and more.

Podcasts (FP & related)

  • Cognicast (also @ iTunes) – Clojure, FP, etc.
  • Functional Geekery (@ iTunes) – A podcast on Functional Programming, covering topics across multiple languages.
  • Mostly λazy…a Clojure podcast by Chas Emerick
  • Giant Robots Smashing into other Giant Robots – “a weekly technical podcast discussing development, design, and the business of software development”
  • Software Engineering Radio (@ iTunes) – “The goal is to be a lasting educational resource, not a newscast. Every two to four weeks, a new episode is published that covers all topics software engineering. Episodes are either tutorials on a specific topic, or an interview with a well-known expert from the software engineering world.”
  • EngineerVsDesigner – design insight (@ iTunes) – product design podcast – the latest digital design news, tips & tricks, Q&A, and an industry special guest

Other

Clojure Corner

Tools/Libs

  • ownCloud – your own Dropbox/Google Drive, run on your server – sharing files between devices / PCs / web, syncing calendar and contacts, collaborative editing of documents (ODF)
  • Mailpile – “A modern, fast web-mail client with user-friendly encryption and privacy features.”, to be self-hosted on a PC, RaspberryPI, USB stick
  • Blackhole – role-based ssh proxy – an app that enables you to manage what users can ssh to what server as a particular user, from users’ point of view this is a ssh proxy; useful if many people need access to many servers but you do not want to add them all as users on those servers.
  • Wuala – Secure Cloud Storage – Backup. Sync. Share. Access Everywhere. – Dropbox alternative, secure by default
  • fb-flo – Facebook’s live-coding tool
  • owncloud.org – self-hosted Dropbox-like service with calendar and contact sync and more

Favourite Quotes

Posted in General, Languages, Tools, Top links of month | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Most interesting links of May ’14

Most interesting links of October ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on October 31, 2013

Recommended Readings

  • Google engineers insist 20% time is not dead—it’s just turned into 120% time – it is interesting to see how has this evolved; “I have done many engineering/coding 20% projects and other non-engineering projects, with probably 20-40% producing “real” results (which over 7 years I think has been more than worth it for the company). But these projects are generally not rewarded.” [highlight mine]
  • The Worst Daily Scrum Ever – a story whose bad part is a too common reality; if energy is low, nobody asks for / offers help, and people only report status / plans then you are doing the daily scrum wrong and should stop now (but it also documents a nice example of a good, effective scrum)
  • Why Responsive Design is a Waste of Time – a refreshingly critical take on responsive design; the author now aknowledges that it is sometimes worth the pain but the points are still valid – responsive design requires (lot of) extra work, the attempt to create a one-size-fits-all site of course adds considerable complexity (having two separate simple frontends might be better than one that is too complex), also many sites are good enough as they are (especially taking into account the capabilities of mobile browsers)
  • How to lose $172,222 a second for 45 minutes – i.e. your bugs are likely not so serious after all 🙂 A financial company screwed big and ended up bankrupt. The cause? Chaotic DevOps, not removing old unused code, reusing a feature flag instead of creating a new one, lack of monitoring. The story in short: They deployed new trading code but failed to notice that it has not been deployed to one of the 8 servers; due to the flag reuse, the old, 10 years unused code has been activated instead. Due to the lack of monitoring they did not notice the cause, tried to roll back while leaving the flag enabled thus effectively activating the bad code on all the servers. => have proper automated and self-checking deployments, delete old code, do not repurpose old switches.
  • 40 Inappropriate Actions to Take Against an Unlocked (Windows) PC – good tips for promoting security and having fun at the same time; I shall keep this at hand 🙂
  • How to go about ‘proving’ why dynamically typed languages are better – a cultivated and interesting discussion; as argueed, thinking in this direction is itself wrong and in different contexts, different languages will be more appropriate. I also like Phil Lord’s “Programming is a highly fashion-centric occupation for any number of reasons.” and “For me, the main advantage is that you are not forced to build complex hierarchies just to support the type system ([..]), and that having only a few abstractions makes it worthwhile adding lots of functions operating over them.” and L. Petit’s “IMHO, the question is irrelevant. It implicitly assumes that statically typed vs dynamically typed is a black / white choice, and that either ‘static wins over dynamic’ or ‘dynamic wins over static’ will be a true statement whatever the context.” Also a good observation that types are only a subset of function contract enforcement and one of possible implementations.
  • The Failure of Governmental IT (Learnings From HealthCare.gov) – links to a few really good articles about the problems with governmental IT in general and my summary of them
  • Inside the Arctic Circle, Where Your Facebook Data Lives – the designs of data centers used to be proprietary secrets until Fb developed its own and open-sourced them, enabling many Asian manufactures to start creating cheaper datacenters and thus started a revolution in this domain. Facebook’s data centers are not general purpose but suitable ot the kind of work they need, but it is still widely applicable. Cool to see how they use natural conditions to get energy needs down and make HW that fits best their needs – that is what I call innovation!
  • Academia.edu (via @RiczWest) – a rich source of free research papers – just register as an independant researcher; also lean/agile/systems thinking and other interesting topics
  • Writing Code? Know Your Boundaries – an inspiring way of thinking; we use many technologies in combination (HTML, CSS, JS, SQL, server-side language, …) and “the risk for picking the wrong tool for the job is strongest near the boundaries“; a discussion of the aforementioned boundaries with examples follows, e.g.: “Avoid putting HTML in JavaScript strings for ‘poor man’s templating‘”, messing up SQL with html (“SELECT '<strong>' + Username + '</strong>' FROM Users“), CSS+HTML: using inline styles, SQL+server-side: string concatenation to create dynamic SQL queries, “writing dynamic JavaScript in a string on the server“. I shall keep this in mind!
  • Johannes Brodwall: A canonical web test – a simple web app end-to-end smoke test – using an embedded Jetty, a test DB (preferably in-memory), WebDriver to test it (simple: browser.get(“/people”), assertThat(browser.findElement(<person id>.contains(<person’s name>)); simple, nice, useful

Learning

  • LearnGitBranching – an online game to learn branching & rebase in git; use the menu in the lower-right corner to navigate between the levels etc. You can also execute commands “show goal”, “hint”, “level” to navigate around; pretty cool and great for learning the command line commands

Society & people

Not a typical topic I share here but really worth it this time.

  • The ocean is broken – a saddening story worth reading to learn what does your tuna sandwitch cost and where does all the plastic we use end up. From a sailing trip from Melbourne to US where there were plenty of fish (and birds) 10 years ago – and 2 this year, killed to a noticable degree by huge fishing ships that catch tuna – and kill and throw away all the other “junk” fish. Nowadays fish are replaced by plastic and other waste that actually prevents usage of the engine unless somebody can watch for dangerous nets and ropes leftovers. Earth, where are you falling to?
  • The Guardian: Why have young people in Japan stopped having sex? – sad and interesting to observe what happens when the system is set up so that people “can’t be bothered” to have inter-sexual relationships, partnership, and children. Japan needs a good deal of systems thinking to fix its broken society where women do not want children because it would cost them their career and neither men nor women are willing to subjects themselves to the social pressure and demands associated with relationships.
  • The Guardian: 29 million people enslaved, says first global index on slavery – welcome to the 21st century! The leading slave countries are India (14M), China (3M), Pakistan (2M). Also, slaves are building the world cup stadion in Qatar.
  • They’re Taking Over! – how we managed to destroy sea ecosystems and helped the now unstoppable return of jellyfish – Jellyfish are evidently very veried and extemely resilient and have been hold at bay only by rather complex ecosystems that we managed to destabilize so much that Jellyfish are on their way back to ruling all the sees again (destroying the rests of the ecosystems – i.e. fish – on the way); a sad future for the sea, Earht, and us

Clojure Corner

Tools/Libs

Mac:

  • WhiteHat Aviator – A Safer Web Browser – WhiteHat, a well-known security company, has released a browser that aims at improving privacy by preventing user tracking (f.ex. but not sending referral URL) and blocking ads even at the cost of occassional slight discomfort, i.e. something that the mainstream browsers are not interested in. So far for OS X only.
  • EnvPane – a preference pane for environment variables for Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion) – set env. vars for GUI/terminal apps, no need to log out upon change

Favorite Quotes

Weinberg: Bureaucracy is what we do when we no longer remember why we are doing it
via Ben Simo, no source specified so it may be fake but anyway it is valid

Posted in General, Languages, Testing, Top links of month | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »