The Holy Java

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Posts Tagged ‘opinion’

The Are No Silver Bullets: Which Error Handling Style to Pick For a Given Configuration of Constraints?

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 18, 2015

Kent Beck in his Patterns Enhance Craft Step 3: A Few Good Solutions highlights an important fact about software development:

We encounter repeating configurations of forces/constraints that have only a handful of “solution families” and the optimal solution(s) depend on the relative weights of these constraints.

For example when deciding what error handling style we should choose when calling an unreliable rutine:

Depending on whether readability, reliability, automated analysis, performance, or future maintenance are most important you could reasonably choose any one of:

  • Exceptions
  • Return value plus errno
  • Exceptional value (e.g. Haskell’s Maybe)
  • Success and failure callbacks

So there is no single perfect error handling style to rule them all.

Kent further explains that the forces shaping most design decisions are generated internal to the process of design, not by external constraints: whether we’re building a barn or an airport, the list of forces influencing the roofing decision is the same – snow, wind, etc. – but their relative strengths may be different. Internal forces in SW development include use of the same bits of logic repeatedly, code made for/by people, etc.. F.ex. the forces influencing naming a variable do not depend on what SW we are building but on its purpose, lifetime, etc. We encounter some configurations of these constraints again and again and a catalogue of design patterns representing the “solution families” mentioned above can guide us towards the most suitable solution for given weights.

Conclusion

When designing a solution, it is helpful to think in terms of these forces and their relative strengths. There is no single superior solution (a.k.a. silver bullet) as different configurations of forces and their weights might be best suited by radically different solutions. Keeping this on our minds might prevent design discussions from dengenerating into an argument.

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Challenging Myself With Coplien’s Why Most Unit Testing is Waste

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 26, 2015

James O. Coplien has written in 2014 the thought-provoking essay Why Most Unit Testing is Waste and further elaborates the topic in his Segue. I love testing but I also value challenging my views to expand my understanding so it was a valuable read. When encountering something so controversial, it’s crucial to set aside one’s emotions and opinions and ask: “Provided that it is true, what in my world view might need questioning and updating?” Judge for yourself how well have I have managed it. (Note: This post is not intended as a full and impartial summary of his writing but rather a overveiw of what I may learn from it.)

Perhaps the most important lesson is this: Don’t blindly accept fads, myths, authorities and “established truths.” Question everything, collect experience, judge for yourself. As J. Coplien himself writes:

Be skeptical of yourself: measure, prove, retry. Be skeptical of me for heaven’s sake.

I am currently fond of unit testing so my mission is now to critically confront Coplien’s ideas and my own preconceptions with practical experience on my next projects.

I would suggest that the main thing you take away isn’t “minimize unit testing” but rather “value thinking, focus on system testing, employ code reviews and other QA measures.”

I’ll list my main take-aways first and go into detail later on:
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Focus & Do the Simplest Thing Possible

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 10, 2015

Credit: Dennis Jarvis, CC

Are you tired of days spent in front of the screen, with no results to show? Have you once again engaged in yak shaving? Today, after having failed previously, I have finally managed to solve a problem while avoiding this trap by following rigorously two guidelines preached by grandmaster programmers. Be warned: Following this approach, you will get a working solution – but you won’t like it. It will be ugly, stained by compromises, far from the elegant solution you wish for. But if your resources are limited and you want to avoid death by too many yaks, this is your only option. But first, what are these guidelines?

One: Maintain a laser-sharp focus. A great programmer is constantly aware of what she is trying to achieve and never strays far from it. If the path leads away, she backs up. If something else pops up, she writes it down for later and gets back to the job. This is essentially about deciding what not to do. (Many thanks to Kent Beck for sharing his focus secret!)

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Tiny, Tiny Steps – Experience Report Developing A Feature In Minimal Value-Adding Increments

Posted by Jakub Holý on November 10, 2014

A post for those who want to see what an iterative, MVP-driven development of a feature looks like.

@lukew: Start with the simplest version you can. It’s much easier to add complexity than to remove it.

Once upon time, there was a webshop portal with hundreds of partner webshops displayed on the front page. Potential users wanted to find out if their favorite webshops or a particular type of goods were available, existing users wanted to find a shop quickly. Therefore it was decided to implement search. But how to do that?

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Frustration-Driven Development – Towards DevOps, Lean, Clojure

Posted by Jakub Holý on March 17, 2014

A post about development practices, speed, and frustration.

My wife has mentioned that she likes my passion for doing things right in software development. That made me thinking, why do I actually care so much and do not just enjoy the coding itself? It boils down to that I am not happy until my code is in production. Seeking the satisfaction of having my code used by and helping people while trying to eliminate all unnecessary mental drain is behind all the practices that I embrace and evangelize. It’s a drug I like to take often, in small doses.

practices = f(max(delivered value), min(mental energy))

So how does this relate to DevOps, Continuous Delivery, testing, single-piece-flow, Lean Startup, Clojure? It is simple.

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Seek Understanding

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 23, 2014

The most important lesson I have learned in 2013 is that I won’t change anything by writing critical blog posts and talking to like-minded people. Fostering the “we vs. them,” we who are right vs. them idiots sentiment is ineffective, even destructive. To be able to achieve anything, I have to talk to the people with opposite opinions and understand them. They are rarely ***holes and typically have good reasons for their opinions. Only by understanding those reasons and the background, history, and emotions they stem from – and hopefully helping the “opponents” understand some of my reasons and context – we can find a common ground and common goals that we can build upon to go further – perhaps not in harmony but still together rather than against each other.

Talking to people is difficult. Having my dearly hold beliefs exposed to discussion and criticism is painful. Trying to find a common ground with people with totally different needs, experiences, and ideas about the best way to do software development in a particular context is challenging. But only by doing so, and by being open to changing my own stance, I can hope to influence the stance of other “stakeholders” and thus bring a positive change to a project or organization.

Side note: It’s funny that the more I learn about IT the more I realize that the main challenges and solutions we encounter are not about technology, but about the fundamentally human in us. Also the approach advocated here – seeking understanding and respect in spite of disagreement instead of the radically adversarial “we vs. them” thinking – is crucial not just for IT, but also for building a better society. So far it unfortunately seems that politicians – especially in the US but not just there – tend to prefer the wrong approach. And also the willingness to expose one’s beliefs to discussion and the openness to change are important not only for talking to people, but for being able to keep developing mentally and spiritually, as put so well by M. Scott Peck in The Road Less Traveled.

I’d like to thank to Markus Krüger for showing me the power of talking to people and to Marshall B. Rosenberg’s Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life for being so inspirational on this path.

You might enjoy also other posts on effective development.

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The Risks Of Big-Bang Deployments And Techniques For Step-wise Deployment

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 17, 2014

If you ever need to persuade management why it might be better to deploy a larger change in multiple stages and push it to customers gradually, read on.

A deployment of many changes is risky. We want therefore to deploy them in a way which minimizes the risk of harm to our customers and our companies. The deployment can be done either in an all-at-once (also known as big-bang) way or a gradual way. We will argue here for the more gradual (“stepwise”) approach.

Big-bang or stepwise deployment?

A big-bang deployment seems to be the natural thing to do: the full solution is developed and tested and then replaces the current system at once. However, it has two crucial flaws.

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Bad Code: Are We Thinking Too Little?

Posted by Jakub Holý on December 31, 2013

Do we not think enough when coding? Do we jump to the first solution without really considering the problem, without trying to analyze and decompose it and understand the components and orthogonal forces invovled? Is that the cause of bad code (together with time press) and the reason why we typically see a “patchvolution” rather than evolution (of design)?

For example I want a certain item on my list shown grayed out because it has been marked for removal or is currently being edited and I therefore add a flag called isDisabled. But if I really thought about it, I would likely call it based on the purpose rather than display, e.g. isBeing Edited. And I have often observed that I/we tend to jump to the first acceptable solution without trying to consider other, (radically) different and perhaps better alternatives. That is easily explained with our inborn intelectual laziness and we certainly can agree that we should not overthink things and that we need to ship but still, shouldn’t we try to think a little more?

The Clojure community has been very inspiring for me in this regard. There is a strong focus on spending more time on the problem than the solution to really understand it, and on separating the different concerns involved and adressing them separately, as well as on achieving simplicity. One of the manifestation is the strong preference of small, focused, composable libraries over frameworks. F.ex. it took couple of years for Clojure to get support for named arguments – but the result – destructuring – is something much more powerful, that now pervades the whole languages (of course, this is a language, not an app). When you listen to Rich Hickey talking f.ex. about core.async (vs. actors, Reactive Extensions etc.) you see that the man thought deeply about the problem, alternatives, and their pros and cons.

May be we should spend little more time with our problems before jumping to solutions, no matter how much we like to solve things. Perhaps we would end up with a much better code than we typically have, and thus considerably lower maintenance costs.

Ref: Simple Made Easy, The Clojure Philosophy from Joy of Clojure.

You might enjoy also other posts on effective development.

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Code Is Cheap, It’s Knowledge Discovery That Costs

Posted by Jakub Holý on December 6, 2013

If we knew exactly what code needs to be written, what needs to be done and how it can be done, we would need very little time to write it. It is the discovery of the knowledge what to build and how to build it that takes all the time. Yet non-developers usually see it as an unacceptable waste to write and then throw away – and perhaps rewrite – code.

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The Invisible Benefits Of Pair-Programming: Avoiding Wasteful Coding Excursions

Posted by Jakub Holý on July 5, 2013

There has been recently an article about how bad, expensive, and wasteful pair-programming is, since you need double as many developers. It used lines of code (LoC) produced per hour as the main metric. As many have commented, LoC is not the best measure, actually just the opposite, as I want to demonstrate on my experience. (The article is questionable also for other reasons, such as providing no data to back its claims of a pari costing 2.5 times more without any quality benefits, which contradicts f.ex. the studies summarized in ch. 17 of Making Software that show one1 1.6* cost + better quality, other 1.15* cost + 15% less failed tests.)

My main point is that by working with another person that you have to justify your plans to, you can be saved from pursuing suboptimal or unnecessary solution, thus considerably reducing both time spent and lines of code produced (more talk, less [wasteful] code).

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