The Holy Java

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Posts Tagged ‘ClojureScript’

Storytelling as a Vehicle of Change: Introducing ClojureScript for the Heart and Mind

Posted by Jakub Holý on October 7, 2015

People don’t really like changes yet change we must in this fast-developing world. How to introduce a change, or rather how to inspire people to embrace a change? That is one of the main questions of my professional life.

I have recently talked about Functional programming (FP) in JavaScript and compared it to ClojureScript, which was designed for FP. To my surprise the team proposed to give ClojureScript a try and we agreed to have a live coding session, implementing a new functionality in our internal part of our webshop using ClojureScript. But how to kindle this little flame of motivation to keep it going, despite hurdles that will certainly come? And here I got a few interesting ideas.

  1. An experienced speaker once recommended sharing personal experiences (even – or especially – if they make me vulnerable) as it is much easier for people to relate to them than to general statements.
  2. A Cognicast eposide mentioned storytelling as a great tool for introductory guides. We humans are natural storytellers, we think in stories and relate to them much more easily – so a story should be great also to communicate the value of a change.
  3. My ex-colleague Therese Ingebrigtsen gave an inspiring talk presenting some points from The Switch – mainly that we need to address the recipient’s minds with rational arguments, but also their hearts to involve their emotion (e.g. by drawing a picture of the new bright future), and that it is important to show a clear path forward.

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Refactoring & Type Errors in Clojure: Experience and Prevention

Posted by Jakub Holý on October 6, 2015

While refactoring a relatively simple Clojure code to use a map instead of a vector, I have wasted perhaps a few hours due to essentially type errors. I want to share the experience and my thoughts about possible solutions since I encounter this problem quite often. I should mention that it is quite likely that it is more a problem (an opportunity? :-)) with me rather than the language, namely with the way I write and (not) test it.

The core of the problem is that I write chains of transformations based on my sometimes flawed idea of what data I have at each stage. The challenge is that I cannot see what the data is and have to maintain a mental model while writing the code, and I suck at it. Evaluating the code in the REPL as I develop it helps somewhat but only when writing it – not when I decide to refactor it.

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Most interesting links of July ’14

Posted by Jakub Holý on July 31, 2014

Recommended Readings

  • Video: The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Dynamic Typing for Practical Programs – a static-typing zealot turned friend of dynamic typing under the experience of real-world projects and problems shares thoughts about the limits of type systems (f.ex. both energy and torque are measured in N*m yet cannot be combined) and their cost: according to the Hanenberg’s experiment about static and dynamic typing => the time required to handle the time chacker > time to debug the errors that it would have caught. According to a review of issues at GitHub, only 2% of reported issues for JS, Clojure, Python, and Ruby are type errors and for a large, closed-source Python project type/name/attribute errors were 1%. “I have come to believe that tests are a much better investment [than static typing].” Rigorous type system/model => limited applicability (due to different needs) <=> modelling some things with types doesn’t cut it. “Are the costs of static typing offset by a few percent fewer defects? Is agility more important than reliability?” “Static types are anti-modular” – too a tight coupling. “Static type checking comes at the expense of complexity, brittleness and a tendency to monoliths.
    (Personally I miss static typing – but that is perhaps due to having relied on it for so long.)
  • ThoughtWorks Tech Radar July 2014 (pdf): f.ex. Ansible in Adapt, Masterless Chef/Puppet in Trial, Machine image as a build artifact: Trial, PostgreSQL for NoSQL: Trial, Adopt Dropwizard (Rest 4 Java), Go lang, Reactive Extensions across langs [JH: RxJava, RxJS, ..]; Asses Property-based (generative) testing, … . Other highlights: Mapbox (open-source mapping platform), OpenID Connect as a less complex and thus promising alternative to SAML/generic OAuth, Pacto/Pact for Consumer-Driven Contracts (contract => simulate consumers/stubb producers => test your REST clients against the contract so that the rest of tests can assume it is correct and use a stubbed client), Swagger for REST documentation.
  • The madness of layered architecture – a nice critique of over-designed “enterprise” apps, why that is a problem (SRP, cost of code, unclear where to do a change, ….), why it is different from the successful layered network stack of Ethernet/IP/TCP/… (because in an app, all layers are on the same level of abstraction); bottom line: do not add a layer unless you have a really good reason (hint: the advice of a consultant/speaker does not count as one)
  • Key Takeaway Points and Lessons Learned from QCon New York 2014 (viz @RiczWest) – “[..] deep insights into real-world architectures and state of the art software development practices, from a practioner’s perspective.” – architectures of Fb, Foursquare etc., continuous delivery, creating culture, real world functional programming, … .
  • Questioning the Lambda Architecture (J. Kreps of LinkedIn) – maintaining the same processing in two very different systems (one batch, one stream & real-time) is a maintenance nightmare => improve the RT/stream processing to handle re-processing and thus both (using e.g. Kafka to store the data and thus be able to re-play them)
  • Google: Checklist for mobile website improvement
  • Google Dataflow and the transition from batch to stream processing – G. Dataflow might not be a Hadoop killer due to requiring that the data are in the Google Cloud but the trend is clear, going away from batch processing to more stream-oriented processing with tools like Spark, Flume etc. that are faster thanks to using memory better and more flexible thanks to not being limited to the rigitd two-stage model of map-reduce. (Reportedly, Google – the one that made Map-Reduce popular – doesn’t use it anymore.)
  • OS X: Extract JDK to folder, without running installer

Society, economics, people

  • HBR: The Power of Meeting Your Employees’ Needs – people feel better, perform better, are more engaged and likely to stay longer (=> profitability) when 4 basic needs are met: physical [energy] renewal (=> give opportunity, encourage to take a nap or do whatever that helps), value – feeling of being valued by the company, ability to focus, purpose (i.e. serving something larger than ourselves). “What’s surprising about our survey’s results is how dramatically and positively getting these needs met is correlated with every variable that influences performance. It would be statistically significant if meeting a given need correlated with a rise of even one or two percentage points in a performance variable such as engagement, or retention. Instead, we found that meeting even one of the four core needs had a dramatic impact on every performance variable we studied. [..] when all four needs are met, the effect on engagement rises from 50% for one need, to 125%. Engagement, in turn, has been positively correlated with profitability. [..] employers with the most engaged employees were 22% more profitable than those with the least engaged employees.
    [..] those who were encouraged to take intermittent breaks reported they were 50% more engaged, more than twice as likely to stay with the company, and twice as healthy overall. Valuing and encouraging renewal requires no financial investment. What it does require is a willingness among leaders to test their longstanding assumption that that performance is best measured by the number of hours employees puts in – and the more continuous the better — rather than by the value they generate, however they choose to do their work.
  • The Pitchforks Are Coming… For Us Plutocrats – increasing inequality will eventually lead to the collapse of the sysem (at least so does teach the history). It is people – primarily the middle class – that are the source of the wealth of the society, they produce and also consume most. Thus it is necessary to support them …
  • Why the U.S. Corporate World Became ‘A Bull Market for Corruption’ – Enron, GM, Goldman Sachs, … – we hear more and more the names of large corporations in the context of negligence and misues of their customers and investors. It seems that leadership (in the lead by example sense) has died out as well as the feeling of responsibility when one wields power over her customers/investors/markets. Instead, we have the me-first and  money at any cost thinking. Organizations are designed to shield higher-ups from responsibility (meetings with no records…). High pay for short term gains, failure to punish high ranking people.
  • (US) This is what happened when I drove my Mercedes to pick up food stamps – the experience of life in poverty after dropping down from $125k to $25k/year in two months due to childbirth, real estate market crash, and loss of a job. “Using the coupons was even worse. The stares, the faux concern, the pity, the outrage — I hated it. [..] That’s the funny thing about being poor. Everyone has an opinion on it, and everyone feels entitled to share. [..] Poverty is a circumstance, not a value judgment. I still have to remind myself sometimes that I was my harshest critic. That the judgment of the disadvantaged comes not just from conservative politicians and Internet trolls. It came from me, even as I was living it.

Clojure Corner

  • Isomorphic Clojure[Script], part I – enjoying all the benefits of Single-Page Apps while avoiding their drawbacks (SEO, slower page load, accessibility etc.) – a SPA that can be pre-rendered by the server. Using Om/React, JDK8 with the Nashorn JS engine, core.async, Sente (bi-dirrectional HTTP/WS communication over core.async) and Clojure in the JVM, ClojureScript in Nashorn in the JVM, and ClojureScript in the browser. Example app: Omelette.
  • clj-crud: a relatively feature-complete example of a Clojure web (4/2014; GitHub) – using Component, Liberator (REST), Datascript + Quiescent (=> React.js), Enlive, Friend etc. including couple of unit-test and ui-test libraries
  • Conclujon: Acceptance testing tool (α), Clojure reimplementation of Concordion, a beautifully simple ADD tool
  • dynalint: human-friendly error messages during dev – Clojure typically provides little helpful and sometimes confusing error messages thrown from somewhere deep in the implementation, such as “Don’t know how to create ISeq from: java.lang.Long at clojure.lang.RT.seqFrom” while we want st. like “First argument to clojure.core/first must be seqable: 1 (instance of class java.lang.Long” – and that’s what Dynalint does. In the tradition of defensive programming, it adds checks and good error messages to Vars at runtime. You typically run it only during dev, triggering it from the REPL.
  • Grimoire (Reid McKenzie) – a more up-to-date replacement for ClojureDocs
  • Adam Bard’s Top Clojure Articles for beginners and intermediate Clojure devs – f.ex. Five Mistakes Clojure Newbies Make, Acceptable Error Handling in Clojure, Clojure Reducers for Mortals
  • J. Wilk: Isolating External Dependencies in Clojure – a nice overview of the options and their pros and cons – with-redefs, alter-var-root, Midje (using alter-var-root in a more controlled manner), higher-order-functions (#1!) etc.
  • philandstuff’s detailed notes from Euroclojure 2014

Tools/Libs

  • NixOS (via @bodil) – a new interesting “purely functional” Linux distribution – system configuration is fully declarative (think of Puppet/Chef) and it is always trivial to roll back, you can have multiple versions of a package, users can install non-global SW
  • InfluxDB – time series, metrics, and events DB that scales; contrary to Graphite it can store richer data than Graphite and its single value; additional highlights: authorization for individual data, roll-up/clean old data, https API. Written in Go.

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Fixing clojurescript.test failing with “ReferenceError: Can’t find variable: cemerick”

Posted by Jakub Holý on May 21, 2014

ClojureScript.test (0.3.0; cemerick.cljs.test) may fail with this confusing exception:

ReferenceError: Can't find variable: cemerick

due to couple of reasons:

  1. Your test namespaces do not require cemerick.cljs.test (and thus it is missing from the compiled .js; requiring macros is not enough)
  2. cljsbuild has not included any of your test files (due to wrong setup etc.; this is essentially another form of #1)
  3. You are trying to test with the node runner but have built with :optimizations :none or :whitespace (for node you need to concatenate everything into a single file, which only happens if you use :simple or :advanced optimizations)

There is a pull request to provide a better error message but until then you have to be aware of these problems.

Example failures from all the runners:

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ClojureScript/Om: Spurious “Minified exception occured” With Advanced Optimizations

Posted by Jakub Holý on May 13, 2014

After having upgraded to Om 0.6.3. and ClojureScript 2197, I suddenly got the following error in the browser when loading the .js compiled with :optimizations :advanced:

Uncaught Error: Minified exception occured; use the non-minified dev environment for the full error message and additional helpful warnings.

In the dev mode, i.e. without any optimizations, the code worked just fine – the same thing that Frozenlock has experienced.

After downgrading, removing Om, and upgrading again it suddnely dissapeared and now Om 0.6.3. and ClojureScript 2197 work just fine. So I suppose that after having changed the versions, I should have properly deleted all generated files (and not just my myapp.min.js).

I hope this helps to somebody.

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core.async: “Can’t recur here” in ClojureScript but OK in Clojure

Posted by Jakub Holý on May 12, 2014

With the latest core.async and ClojureScript (core.async "0.1.303.0-886421-alpha" and clojurescript "0.0-2202" as well as the older core.async "0.1.267.0-0d7780-alpha" and clojurescript "0.0-2173"), the following function compiles just fine in Clojure but fails in ClojureScript:

(defn cljs-cannot-recur! []
  (go-loop [v nil]
    (when-let [next-val (<! (timeout 300))]
      (recur next-val))))

The error in ClojureScript is

clojure.lang.ExceptionInfo: Can't recur here at line 23 /my/path/core.cljs ::
  {:tag :cljs/analysis-error, :file "/my/path/core.cljs", :line 23, :column 7}
             core.clj:4403 clojure.core/ex-info
             ... // very long stacktrace of 0 value

Workaround: replace (go-loop ..) with (go (loop ..)).

Another fun fact: ClojureScript’s core.async lacks (at least) alt! (I did work around it by using alts! so it is not a show-stopper but still the difference is irritating and I fail to understand why it is missing.)

Oh, joy!

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Most interesting links of April ’14

Posted by Jakub Holý on April 30, 2014

Recommended Readings

  • The economics of reuse – developing code for reuse costs much more than for one need – it might cost 300% more to develop and save you 75% of work when (re)using it instead of developing from scratch (if one of the factors goes down, the other one typically goes down too). Summary: “That means that to get any value from your reused component, you better have five or more reusers or you have to find a way to substantially improve the [reuse value factor] or [reusability cost factor]. Very smart people have failed to do this.
  • Book in making: Reactive Design Patterns (1st ch free)

Sharing data on the web

Clojure Corner

  • 8th Light: Combining Clojure and ClojureScript Libraries (3/2014) – really good and detailed article / tutorial using CLJX and platform-specific platform.clj[s] files to share code between Clojure and ClojureScript. It also recommends a file structure (src/(clj|cljs)/), demonstrates testing, discusses macro development, shows how to pack both into one jar.

Tools/Libs

Favourite Quotes

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Kioo: How to Troubleshoot Template Processing

Posted by Jakub Holý on April 8, 2014

So you have created an Om/Reagent/React component using a Kioo template and the result is not as you expected, perhaps just an empty element? Let me share what I have discovered about troubleshooting this (though I am no expert). You will se how to invoke the underlying Clojure function component* manually, how to expand the deftemplate macro, how to call the resulting JavaScript function, and what the intermediate forms look like.

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Kioo: How To Replace The Whole Body

Posted by Jakub Holý on April 8, 2014


This whole post in unnecessary since it is simply possible to use a snippet directly without a template, as kindly explained by Creighton Kirkendall.

Kioo, the enlive-inspired templating library for React.js and derived libs such as Om, normally works by matching selectors against elements inside <body> and transforming the matched elements while also keeping all the other ones. But what if you want to keep just the single matched element and drop all the others? You need some tricks and I will demonstrate one possible way.

Dislaimer: This is a result of my experimentation, not deep knowledge if Kioo.

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Most interesting links of October ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on October 31, 2013

Recommended Readings

  • Google engineers insist 20% time is not dead—it’s just turned into 120% time – it is interesting to see how has this evolved; “I have done many engineering/coding 20% projects and other non-engineering projects, with probably 20-40% producing “real” results (which over 7 years I think has been more than worth it for the company). But these projects are generally not rewarded.” [highlight mine]
  • The Worst Daily Scrum Ever – a story whose bad part is a too common reality; if energy is low, nobody asks for / offers help, and people only report status / plans then you are doing the daily scrum wrong and should stop now (but it also documents a nice example of a good, effective scrum)
  • Why Responsive Design is a Waste of Time – a refreshingly critical take on responsive design; the author now aknowledges that it is sometimes worth the pain but the points are still valid – responsive design requires (lot of) extra work, the attempt to create a one-size-fits-all site of course adds considerable complexity (having two separate simple frontends might be better than one that is too complex), also many sites are good enough as they are (especially taking into account the capabilities of mobile browsers)
  • How to lose $172,222 a second for 45 minutes – i.e. your bugs are likely not so serious after all 🙂 A financial company screwed big and ended up bankrupt. The cause? Chaotic DevOps, not removing old unused code, reusing a feature flag instead of creating a new one, lack of monitoring. The story in short: They deployed new trading code but failed to notice that it has not been deployed to one of the 8 servers; due to the flag reuse, the old, 10 years unused code has been activated instead. Due to the lack of monitoring they did not notice the cause, tried to roll back while leaving the flag enabled thus effectively activating the bad code on all the servers. => have proper automated and self-checking deployments, delete old code, do not repurpose old switches.
  • 40 Inappropriate Actions to Take Against an Unlocked (Windows) PC – good tips for promoting security and having fun at the same time; I shall keep this at hand 🙂
  • How to go about ‘proving’ why dynamically typed languages are better – a cultivated and interesting discussion; as argueed, thinking in this direction is itself wrong and in different contexts, different languages will be more appropriate. I also like Phil Lord’s “Programming is a highly fashion-centric occupation for any number of reasons.” and “For me, the main advantage is that you are not forced to build complex hierarchies just to support the type system ([..]), and that having only a few abstractions makes it worthwhile adding lots of functions operating over them.” and L. Petit’s “IMHO, the question is irrelevant. It implicitly assumes that statically typed vs dynamically typed is a black / white choice, and that either ‘static wins over dynamic’ or ‘dynamic wins over static’ will be a true statement whatever the context.” Also a good observation that types are only a subset of function contract enforcement and one of possible implementations.
  • The Failure of Governmental IT (Learnings From HealthCare.gov) – links to a few really good articles about the problems with governmental IT in general and my summary of them
  • Inside the Arctic Circle, Where Your Facebook Data Lives – the designs of data centers used to be proprietary secrets until Fb developed its own and open-sourced them, enabling many Asian manufactures to start creating cheaper datacenters and thus started a revolution in this domain. Facebook’s data centers are not general purpose but suitable ot the kind of work they need, but it is still widely applicable. Cool to see how they use natural conditions to get energy needs down and make HW that fits best their needs – that is what I call innovation!
  • Academia.edu (via @RiczWest) – a rich source of free research papers – just register as an independant researcher; also lean/agile/systems thinking and other interesting topics
  • Writing Code? Know Your Boundaries – an inspiring way of thinking; we use many technologies in combination (HTML, CSS, JS, SQL, server-side language, …) and “the risk for picking the wrong tool for the job is strongest near the boundaries“; a discussion of the aforementioned boundaries with examples follows, e.g.: “Avoid putting HTML in JavaScript strings for ‘poor man’s templating‘”, messing up SQL with html (“SELECT '<strong>' + Username + '</strong>' FROM Users“), CSS+HTML: using inline styles, SQL+server-side: string concatenation to create dynamic SQL queries, “writing dynamic JavaScript in a string on the server“. I shall keep this in mind!
  • Johannes Brodwall: A canonical web test – a simple web app end-to-end smoke test – using an embedded Jetty, a test DB (preferably in-memory), WebDriver to test it (simple: browser.get(“/people”), assertThat(browser.findElement(<person id>.contains(<person’s name>)); simple, nice, useful

Learning

  • LearnGitBranching – an online game to learn branching & rebase in git; use the menu in the lower-right corner to navigate between the levels etc. You can also execute commands “show goal”, “hint”, “level” to navigate around; pretty cool and great for learning the command line commands

Society & people

Not a typical topic I share here but really worth it this time.

  • The ocean is broken – a saddening story worth reading to learn what does your tuna sandwitch cost and where does all the plastic we use end up. From a sailing trip from Melbourne to US where there were plenty of fish (and birds) 10 years ago – and 2 this year, killed to a noticable degree by huge fishing ships that catch tuna – and kill and throw away all the other “junk” fish. Nowadays fish are replaced by plastic and other waste that actually prevents usage of the engine unless somebody can watch for dangerous nets and ropes leftovers. Earth, where are you falling to?
  • The Guardian: Why have young people in Japan stopped having sex? – sad and interesting to observe what happens when the system is set up so that people “can’t be bothered” to have inter-sexual relationships, partnership, and children. Japan needs a good deal of systems thinking to fix its broken society where women do not want children because it would cost them their career and neither men nor women are willing to subjects themselves to the social pressure and demands associated with relationships.
  • The Guardian: 29 million people enslaved, says first global index on slavery – welcome to the 21st century! The leading slave countries are India (14M), China (3M), Pakistan (2M). Also, slaves are building the world cup stadion in Qatar.
  • They’re Taking Over! – how we managed to destroy sea ecosystems and helped the now unstoppable return of jellyfish – Jellyfish are evidently very veried and extemely resilient and have been hold at bay only by rather complex ecosystems that we managed to destabilize so much that Jellyfish are on their way back to ruling all the sees again (destroying the rests of the ecosystems – i.e. fish – on the way); a sad future for the sea, Earht, and us

Clojure Corner

Tools/Libs

Mac:

  • WhiteHat Aviator – A Safer Web Browser – WhiteHat, a well-known security company, has released a browser that aims at improving privacy by preventing user tracking (f.ex. but not sending referral URL) and blocking ads even at the cost of occassional slight discomfort, i.e. something that the mainstream browsers are not interested in. So far for OS X only.
  • EnvPane – a preference pane for environment variables for Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion) – set env. vars for GUI/terminal apps, no need to log out upon change

Favorite Quotes

Weinberg: Bureaucracy is what we do when we no longer remember why we are doing it
via Ben Simo, no source specified so it may be fake but anyway it is valid

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