The Holy Java

Building the right thing, building it right, fast

The Are No Silver Bullets: Which Error Handling Style to Pick For a Given Configuration of Constraints?

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 18, 2015

Kent Beck in his Patterns Enhance Craft Step 3: A Few Good Solutions highlights an important fact about software development:

We encounter repeating configurations of forces/constraints that have only a handful of “solution families” and the optimal solution(s) depend on the relative weights of these constraints.

For example when deciding what error handling style we should choose when calling an unreliable rutine:

Depending on whether readability, reliability, automated analysis, performance, or future maintenance are most important you could reasonably choose any one of:

  • Exceptions
  • Return value plus errno
  • Exceptional value (e.g. Haskell’s Maybe)
  • Success and failure callbacks

So there is no single perfect error handling style to rule them all.

Kent further explains that the forces shaping most design decisions are generated internal to the process of design, not by external constraints: whether we’re building a barn or an airport, the list of forces influencing the roofing decision is the same – snow, wind, etc. – but their relative strengths may be different. Internal forces in SW development include use of the same bits of logic repeatedly, code made for/by people, etc.. F.ex. the forces influencing naming a variable do not depend on what SW we are building but on its purpose, lifetime, etc. We encounter some configurations of these constraints again and again and a catalogue of design patterns representing the “solution families” mentioned above can guide us towards the most suitable solution for given weights.

Conclusion

When designing a solution, it is helpful to think in terms of these forces and their relative strengths. There is no single superior solution (a.k.a. silver bullet) as different configurations of forces and their weights might be best suited by radically different solutions. Keeping this on our minds might prevent design discussions from dengenerating into an argument.

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Fix Shell Script Run via SSH Hanging (Jenkins)

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 17, 2015

There is an important difference between running a script manually (ssh machine; machine$ ./script.sh) and running it via ssh (ssh machine < script.sh): in the letter case the connection will not close when the script finishes but will stay open until stdout/stderr are closed or a timeout occurs. In Jenkins it will therefore seem as if the script hangs.

So if your shell scripts starts any background job, make sure to redirect all its output to somewhere:

nohup some-background-task &> /dev/null   # No space between & and > !

This has bitten me when trying to deploy an application from the Jenkins CI using SSH and a shell script.

References: http://www.snailbook.com/faq/background-jobs.auto.html

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Challenging Myself With Coplien’s Why Most Unit Testing is Waste

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 26, 2015

James O. Coplien has written in 2014 the thought-provoking essay Why Most Unit Testing is Waste and further elaborates the topic in his Segue. I love testing but I also value challenging my views to expand my understanding so it was a valuable read. When encountering something so controversial, it’s crucial to set aside one’s emotions and opinions and ask: “Provided that it is true, what in my world view might need questioning and updating?” Judge for yourself how well have I have managed it. (Note: This post is not intended as a full and impartial summary of his writing but rather a overveiw of what I may learn from it.)

Perhaps the most important lesson is this: Don’t blindly accept fads, myths, authorities and “established truths.” Question everything, collect experience, judge for yourself. As J. Coplien himself writes:

Be skeptical of yourself: measure, prove, retry. Be skeptical of me for heaven’s sake.

I am currently fond of unit testing so my mission is now to critically confront Coplien’s ideas and my own preconceptions with practical experience on my next projects.

I would suggest that the main thing you take away isn’t “minimize unit testing” but rather “value thinking, focus on system testing, employ code reviews and other QA measures.”

I’ll list my main take-aways first and go into detail later on:
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Running JavaScript Tests On a CI Server With Karma, Chrome And Fake X

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 13, 2015

So I want to run my JavaScript tests in a browser on our CI server. But the server has no graphical environment and the tests do not run under PhantomJS 1.x because it uses too old WebKit without ES5. The solution? Use a real browser and fake X via Xvfb. The browser I use is Chrome though Firefox would like work as well.

In code:
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Focus & Do the Simplest Thing Possible

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 10, 2015

Credit: Dennis Jarvis, CC

Are you tired of days spent in front of the screen, with no results to show? Have you once again engaged in yak shaving? Today, after having failed previously, I have finally managed to solve a problem while avoiding this trap by following rigorously two guidelines preached by grandmaster programmers. Be warned: Following this approach, you will get a working solution – but you won’t like it. It will be ugly, stained by compromises, far from the elegant solution you wish for. But if your resources are limited and you want to avoid death by too many yaks, this is your only option. But first, what are these guidelines?

One: Maintain a laser-sharp focus. A great programmer is constantly aware of what she is trying to achieve and never strays far from it. If the path leads away, she backs up. If something else pops up, she writes it down for later and gets back to the job. This is essentially about deciding what not to do. (Many thanks to Kent Beck for sharing his focus secret!)

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Continuous Delivery Digest: Ch.9 Testing Non-Functional Requirements

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 8, 2015

(Cross-posted from blog.iterate.no)

Digest of chapter 9 of the Continuous Delivery bible by Humble and Farley. See also the digest of ch 8: Automated Acceptance Testing.

(“cross-functional” might be better as they too are crucial for functionality)

  • f.ex. security, usability, maintainability, auditability, configurability but especially capacity, throughput, performance
  • performance = time to process 1 transaction (tx); throughput = #tx/a period; capacity = max throughput we can handle under a given load while maintaining acceptable response times.
  • NFRs determine the architecture so we must define them early; all (ops, devs, testers, customer) should meet to estimate their impact (it costs to increase any of them and often they go contrary to each other, e.g. security and performance)
  • das appropriate, you can either create specific stories for NFRs (e.g. capacity; => easier to prioritize explicitely) or/and add them as requirements to feature stories
  • if poorly analyzed then they constrain thinking, lead to overdesign and inappropriate optimization
  • only ever optimize based on facts, i.e. realistic measurements (if you don’t know it: developers are really terrible at guessing the source of performance problems)

A strategy to address capacity problems:

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Notes On Automated Acceptance Testing (from the Continuous Delivery book)

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 8, 2015

(Cross-posted from blog.iterate.no)

These are my rather extensive notes from reading the chapter 8 on Automated Acceptance Testing in the Continuous Delivery bible by Humble and Farley. There is plenty of very good advice that I just had to take record of. Acceptance testing is an exciting and important subject. Why should you care about it? Because:

We know from experience that without excellent automated acceptance test coverage, one of three things happens: Either a lot of time is spent trying to find and fix bugs at the end of the process when you thought you were done, or you spend a great deal of time and money on manual acceptance and regression testing, or you end up releasing poor-quality software.

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The blog’s year 2014 in review

Posted by Jakub Holý on January 5, 2015

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 170,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 7 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Connect Tunnelblick to VPN automatically after wake up

Posted by Jakub Holý on December 12, 2014

Need: Make sure that VPN is always running except when at work.

Partial solution: Make sure VPN is always running with “connect when computer starts” and using an AppleScript to connect after waking up from sleep. Disconnect manually when at work.

Future: Check the current location (wifi name? IP?) and do not connect when at work.

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Book Review & Digest: Capital In The Twenty-First Century

Posted by Jakub Holý on November 21, 2014

My key takeaways and highlights from the book. This is not an objective and consistent review.

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty is together with Thinking, Fast and Slow, the most important book on society I’ve ever read. And together with Rawls’ A Theory of Justice it has shaped my opinions on society and justice. All politicians and good people interested in politics and inequality should study it. It is unique in leveraging over 200 hundred years of data from different countries and using those as the base of the discussion of the evolution, laws, and future of capital and (in)justice in its distribution.

Key points:

  • Growth cannot be 4-5% forever. In the long term, 1-1.5% is more realstic (and still far more than in the past). Higher growth is typical of countries catching up to more advanced economies (such as Europe to US, UK after WW2, China to the West nowadays).
  • Return on capital, typically 4-5% (before taxes), is thus far higher than the growth of economy and salaries. The result is that the rich get ever richer, taking ever more of the national income. (Consequently, the poorer half has ever less of it.)
  • To keep democracy and have a stable society, this has to be adressed politically.

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