My Highlights from Continuous Delivery and DevOps Conference 2015

The first Continuous Delivery and DevOps Conference in Oslo is over. It was nice to see so many people interested in the topic. I would have preferred more practical talks of the “how we did it” type over the “why” type but it was OK, though next year I would prefer flatMap. Here are my highlights: AtmelContinue reading “My Highlights from Continuous Delivery and DevOps Conference 2015”

AWS CloudWatch Alarms Too Noisy Due To Ignoring Missing Data in Averages

I want to know when our app starts getting slower so I sat up an alarm on the Latency metric of our ELB. According to the AWS Console, “This alarm will trigger when the blue line [average latency over the period of 15 min] goes above the red line [2 sec] for a duration ofContinue reading “AWS CloudWatch Alarms Too Noisy Due To Ignoring Missing Data in Averages”

Book Review & Digest: Capital In The Twenty-First Century

My key takeaways and highlights from the book. This is not an objective and consistent review. Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty is together with Thinking, Fast and Slow, the most important book on society I’ve ever read. And together with Rawls’ A Theory of Justice it has shaped my opinions on societyContinue reading “Book Review & Digest: Capital In The Twenty-First Century”

Most interesting links of July ’14

Recommended Readings Video: The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Dynamic Typing for Practical Programs – a static-typing zealot turned friend of dynamic typing under the experience of real-world projects and problems shares thoughts about the limits of type systems (f.ex. both energy and torque are measured in N*m yet cannot be combined) and their cost: according toContinue reading “Most interesting links of July ’14”

Most interesting links of June ’14

Recommended Readings The emperor’s new clothes were built with Node.js – I know sadly little about Node.js but this goes against the hype and is thus interesting. So what does Node.js give us? Performance 1-5x slower than Java [like Clojure] according to the Benchmarks Game (contrary to other benchmarks with the opposite result as mentionedContinue reading “Most interesting links of June ’14”

Most interesting links of May ’14

Recommended Readings Monolith – from The Codeless Code – fables and koans for the SW engineer – the Monad monolth #Haskell #fun http2 explained (pdf, 27 pages) – cons of http 1 (huge spec / no full impl., wasteful use of TCP <=> latency [x spriting, inlining, concatenation, sharding]) => make it less latency sensitive,Continue reading “Most interesting links of May ’14”

Most interesting links of April ’14

Recommended Readings The economics of reuse – developing code for reuse costs much more than for one need – it might cost 300% more to develop and save you 75% of work when (re)using it instead of developing from scratch (if one of the factors goes down, the other one typically goes down too). Summary:Continue reading “Most interesting links of April ’14”

Most interesting links of March ’14

Recommended Readings Clojure Corner Timo Mihaljov’s Pimp My REPL (3/2014)- really great tips – user.clj, :dev profile, user-wide config in .lein/profiles.clj, tools.namespace, making funs available everywhere & more via Vinyasa, form println with Spyscope, debug-repl, difform, clj-ns-browser Tools/Libs clj-ds – Clojure immutable datastructures extracted from Clojure and made easier for use directly in Java Favourite Quotes

How To Generate A Valid Credit Card Number For A Bin (First 6 Digits)

There is plenty of generators that can produce numbers that are valid credit card numbers according to the Luhn check and specific rules of the individual issuer companies. However I have not found anything that would generate the missing digits given a bin, i.e. the first 6 digits of a credit card (the “bank identificationContinue reading “How To Generate A Valid Credit Card Number For A Bin (First 6 Digits)”

Most interesting links of February ’14

Recommended Readings Development Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names – summary: there are no rules that apply to names, do not assume anything (my favourite: 12 + 13) Nathan Marz: Principles of Software Engineering, Part 1 – Nathan has worked with Big Data at Twitter and other places and really knows the perils or large, distributed, real-time systems andContinue reading “Most interesting links of February ’14”