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IDEs and various other developer tools

Ansible: Best practices for deriving host-level var from a group var

Posted by Jakub Holý on March 19, 2014

I have a cluster and a group variable (in test/staging/prod) holding the hostname of the cluster master. For each host, I want to derive a variable which is set to either “slave” or “master” and use it in templates.

This can be done with set_fact:

---
# group_vars/staging:
jboss_master_host: barad-dur.example.com

 

---
# roles/xxx/tasks/main.yml:
- name: Set default jboss_host_type
  set_fact: jboss_host_type=slave
- name: Set jboss_host_type to master if master
  set_fact: jboss_host_type=master
  when: jboss_master_host == inventory_hostname

We could simplify that by using more advanced Jinja:

---
# roles/xxx/tasks/main.yml:
- name: Set jboss_host_type var
  set_fact: jboss_host_type={{ 'master' if jboss_master_host == inventory_hostname else 'slave' }}

but it is preferred not to use logic coded in Jinja2.

// Ansible 1.5.3

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Recursive Copy In Ansible 1.5 And –diff

Posted by Jakub Holý on March 5, 2014

Ansible 1.5 has partial support for recursive copy of files:

  • the synchronize module, using rsync
    • cons: does not support group=, owner=
    • -C and –diff – it does not print diff of the files changed; when running ansible with -v, it will print output of rsync’s –itemize-changes, i.e., for each changed file/dir, something like “<f.st…… conf/httpd.conf\n” (< = file uploaded, s = size changed, t = timestamp changed, . = this attribute has not been changed)
  • the copy module
    • -C –diff – it only reports “changed” without naming the changed files or showing diffs (unless there is only one changed file)
  • the local_action module, used to run rsync manually (essentially the same as synchronize but more control)
  • So the only way to do a kind of recursive copy with working diff is to use copy with with_fileglob for each directory and subdirectory :-(

To check differences (without diff) manually:

rsync -e ssh -vrnc --itemize-changes source/dir myuser@myserver:/opt/dest/

where v= verbose, r = recursive, n = dry-run, c = check based on checksum, not timestamp+size; a typical output for a changed file is <fcsT...... httpd.conf (< = to be uploaded, f = it is a file, c = checksum differ, s = size differ, T = timestamp would be updated).

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Ansible Troubleshooting Tips

Posted by Jakub Holý on March 4, 2014

Few tips for troubleshooting Ansible, based on my brief experiences with Ansible 1.4 (read: do not rely on this info too much).

Run ansible-playbook in the verbose mode

ansible-playbook -vvvv ... will provide you with plenty of details of what is going on. (Notice that additional v:s, starting from none, add more detail.)

Use ./hacking/test-module

Check out Ansible sources and use the ./hacking/test-module script – see Developing Modules.

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Most interesting links of February ’14

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 28, 2014

Recommended Readings

Development

  • Nathan Marz: Principles of Software Engineering, Part 1 - Nathan has worked with Big Data at Twitter and other places and really knows the perils or large, distributed, real-time systems and this post contains plenty of valuable advice for making robust, reliable SW. Main message: “there’s a lot of uncertainty in software engineering“; every SW operates correctly only for a certain range of inputs (including volume, HW it runs on, …) and you never control all of them so there always is an opportunity for failure; you can’t predict what inputs you will encounter in the wild. “[..] while software is deterministic, you can’t treat it as deterministic in any sort of practical sense if you want to build robust software.” “Making software robust is an iterative process: you build and test it as best you can, but inevitably in production you’ll discover new areas of the input space that lead to failure. Like rockets, it’s crucial to have excellent monitoring in place so that these issues can be diagnosed.“. From the content: Sources of uncertainty (bugs, humans, requirements, inputs, ..), Engineering for uncertainty (minimize dependencies, lessen % of cascading failure [JH: -> Hystrix], measure and monitor)
    • Suffering-oriented programming is certainly also worth reading (summary: do not start with great designs; only start generalizing and creating libs when you have suffered enough from doing things more manually and thus learned the domain; make it possible > make it beautiful > make it fast, repeat)
  • ThoughtWorks open-sources Go, continuous delivery platform - good bye, Jenkins! – better support for pipelines etc., see features and elementary concepts
  • Cloud Design Patterns: Prescriptive Architecture Guidance for Cloud Applications (recommended by @markusbk so it must be good); Patterns: Cache-aside, Circuit Breaker, Compensating Transaction, Competing Consumers, Compute Resource Consolidation, Command and Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS), Event Sourcing, External Configuration Store, Federated Identity, Gatekeeper, Health Endpoint Monitoring, Index Table, Leader Election, Materialized View, Pipes and Filters, Priority Queue, Queue-based Load Leveling, Retry, Runtime Reconfiguration, Scheduler Agent Supervisor, (data) Sharding, Static Content Hosting (-> CDN), Throttling, Valet Key.
    Guidance topics: Asynchronous Messaging Primer, Autoscaling, Caching, Compute Partitioning, Data Consistency Primer, Data Partitioning, Data Replication and Synchronization, Instrumentation and Telemetry, Multiple Datacenter Deployment, Service Metering
  • MOOC course Functional programming with Clojure at Uni of Helsinki – to get started you need, I suppose, follow the “Material and course content” – essentially read the text for each chapter, clone its repo, submit pull requests to get your work graded
  • Jez Humble: The Case for Continuous Delivery - read to persuade manager about CD: “Still, many managers and executives remain unconvinced as to the benefits [of CD], and would like to know more about the economic drivers behind CD.” CD reduces waste: “[..]online controlled experiments (A/B tests) at Amazon. This approach created hundreds of millions of dollars of value[..],” reduces risks: “[..] Etsy, has a great presentation which describes how deploying more frequently improves the stability of web services.” CD makes development cheaper by reducing the cost of non-value-adding activities such as integration and testing. F.ex. HP got dev. costs down by 40%, dev cost/program by 78%

Web

  • Client-side messaging in JavaScript – Part 3 (anti-patterns) (via @ruudud so it must be worth reading)
  • Request Quest (via @jraregris) – entertaining and educational intractive quiz regarding what does (not) trigger a request in browsers and differences between them (and deviances from the standard) – img, script, css, etc.
  • The REST Statelessness Constraint - a nice post about statelessness in REST if you, like me, don’t know REST so much in depth; highlights: Statelesness (and thus the requirement for clients to send their state with every request) is a trade-off crucial for web-scale and partially balanced by caching – while typical enterprise apps have different needs (more state, less scale) so REST isn’t a perfect match. Distinguish application (client-side) and server (resources) state. Using a DB to hold the state still violates the requirement. Use links to transfer some state (e.g. contain a link to fetch the next page of records in the response).
  • Functional Programming in Javascript – an interactive tutorial teaching map, filter, mergeAll, reduce, zip

Other

  • CodeMesh 2013 presentations - good stuff! F.ex. Refactoring Functional Programs: Past and Future, Distribution, Scale and Flexibility with ZeroMQ, Deepak Giridharagopal on Puppet, Immutable Deployments, Analyzing Systems with PuppetDB, Francesco Cesarini and Viktor Klang on the Reactive Manifesto and more
  • Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty - people under pressure/stress start to focus on risks over gains and (very) short-term rather than long-term and thus also adopt 0-some mindset (i.e. if sb. else wins, I loose) => polarization into we x them and focus on getting as big piece of the cake possible at any price, now, dismissal of collaboration. With accelerating rate of change in the society due to technology, this is exactly what is happening. How to counter it? Create more positive narratives than the threat-based ones (views of the world), support them via short-term gains. Bottom line: each of us must work on spreading a more positive attitude to save us from bleak future.
  • Book – Nathan Marz: Big Data - I dislike the big data hype (and, with passion, Hadoop) but would love to read this book; it presents a fresh look at big data processing, heavily inspired by functional programming. Nathan has plenty of experiences from Twitter and creating Storm and Cascalog (both in Clojure, btw.). Read ch 1:  A new paradigm for big data.
  • Facebook Engineering: The Mature Optimization Handbook (or go directly to the pdf,   ePubMobi). If you get bored, jump directly to ch 5. Instrumentation.

Clojure Corner

  • Schmetterling - Debug running clojure processes from the browser! – upon an exception, the process will pause and S. will show the stack, which you can navigate and see locals and run code in the context of any stack frame; you can also trigger it from your code
  • Gorilla REPL (screenshot, 11min video)- interactive web-based notebook where you can mix text (with Markdown formatting), mathematical formulas via LaTeX, graphs, tables, Clojure code. Great for exploring and, at the same time, describing data. <3
  • Local state is harmful – how can we answer the questions about when/why did state X change, how did output Y get where it is? Make state explicit, f.ex. one global map holding all of it, and perhaps not just the current state but also history – thus we can easily query it. Prismatic’ Graph can be used to make the state map, watches to keep history. Inspired by databases (Datomic is an excellent example of SW where answering such questions is trivial)
  • S. Corfield: Insanely Useful Leiningen Plugins - lein-ancient (find updated deps), lein-exec (execute Clj from cmd.line / scripts in Clj), lein-try (try a lib in REPL), Eastwood - a lint tool for Clojure
  • Sente – Clojure(Script) + core.async + WebSockets/Ajax - a tiny 600 LoC library for websockets (with fall-back to long-polling) communication between ClojureScript frontend and clojure backend, using EDN, support for request-reply and multiple user windows/tabs (comparison with Chord (no non-WS fallback or req/resp))
  • Nicholas Kariniemi: Why is Clojure bootstrapping so slow? – don’t blame the JVM, most time spent in clojure.core according to this analyzes on JVM and Android (create and set vars, load other namespaces); some proposals for improving it – lazy loading, excluding functionality not used, …
  • Cheat your way to running CLJS on Node – (ab)use D. Nolen’s mies template intended for client-side cljs development to create a Node project; the trick: compile everything into 1 file so that Node does not fail to find dependencies, disable source maps etc. Update: the nodecljs template now does this
  • lt-clojure-tutorial - A Clojure tutorial optimized for Light Table, ported from Nolen’s cljs tutorial

Tools/Libs

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Demonstration of Ansible Features With Control & Test VMs

Posted by Jakub Holý on February 16, 2014

I have created a small project to demonstrate some features of Ansible, the new DevOps hotness, including Vagrant VMs for running Ansible and for testing the configuration. Either go straight to

https://github.com/jakubholynet/ansible-example-with-vm

or continue reading the copy & paste here.

This project has three things of interest:

  1. A non-trivial Ansible configuration that demonstrates couple of useful features and tricks
  2. A Vagrant/VirtualBox virtual machine with Ansible & co. to make it easy to run it (even on Windows)
  3. Another VM that can be used to test the configuration

And of course all the plumbing that makes them work together. It might be therefore a good base for Ansible projects of your own.

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Most interesting links of September ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on September 30, 2013

Recommended Readings

  • Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For September 13, 2013 – a collection of interesting performance related articles with summaries (via @_dagi)
  • Can you copy a culture? The NUMMI story (audio/transcript) – how the GM factory with the worst workforce has been turned around via a good application of Toyota Production System – “a truly inspiring story of human potential and how systems can be designed to bring the best or worst of of people.” And how GM failed to learn from it and to copy Toyota’s culture.
  • The Reactive Manifesto – why to write reactive SW – “Reactive applications represent a balanced approach to addressing a wide range of contemporary challenges in software development. Building on an event-driven, message-based foundation, they provide the tools needed to ensure scalability and resilience. On top of this they support rich, responsive user interactions. We expect that a rapidly increasing number of systems will follow this blueprint in the years ahead.
  • Frameworkless JavaScript – Why Angular, Ember, or Backbone don’t work for us [Moot discussion platform] (via JavaScriptWeekly) Me: Frameworks are not always evil, but are likely overused and there are good cases when rolling your own solution is the best way. Why in Moot? Because the want a minimal API (no framework methods), small code size, small and familiar code base, no dependency hell and external package updates, no lock-in to technology that will be gone in few years, need WebSockets not REST. “Moot uses native pushState for managing URLs, John Resig’s “micro templating” for views, and internal communication between model and views happens with a custom event library. There is no router or automatic data-binding.” The looked at Angular, Ember, Backbone. “As a result of our combined perfectionism and minimalism, Moot is an extremely lightweight, manageable, and independent web application [..]
  • NYT: Eiji Toyoda, Promoter of the Toyota Way and Engineer of Its Growth, Dies at 100 – learn about the life of one of the founders of lean thinking
  • Gojko Adzic: How we solved our #1 product management problem – valuable experience of false assumptions, learning from users, and a much helpful UI remake: even if you build a product to scratch your itch, you have to test it with real users

Big data

  • Don’t use Hadoop – your data isn’t that big – a great post about the downside of Hadoop and that there are much better options (large disks, large RAM, Pandas/R/Postgres) for data up to few TBs. “In addition to being more difficult to code for, Hadoop will also nearly always be slower than the simpler alternatives.”
  • Gartner On Big Data: Everyone’s Doing It, No One Knows Why – golf talk / hype -driven initiatives FTW! “According to a recent Gartner report, 64% of enterprises surveyed indicate that they’re deploying or planning Big Data projects. Yet even more acknowledge that they still don’t know what to do with Big Data.”
  • What makes Spark exciting – why it might be a good replacement for Hive/Hadoop, based on experiences with H/H: “Hive has served us well for quite a while now. [...]  That said, it has gotten to the point where Hive is more frequently invoked in negative contexts (“damn it, Hive”) than positive. (Primarily due to being hard to test, hard to extend.)” “We had heard about Spark, but did not start trying it until being so impressed by the Spark presentation at AWS re:Invent [..] that we wanted to learn more. [..] Spark, either intentionally or serendipitously, addresses both of Hive’s primary shortcomings, and turns them into huge strengths. (Easy to test, extend.) [..] I find the codebase small and very easy to read, [..] –which is a nice consolation compared to the daunting codebases of Hadoop and Hive.” Cons.: Spark is only pre-1.0, the author hasn’t yet tested it heavily.
  • 10 Ways to Make Your Office Fun To Work In – because we spend there plenty of our time so why not have a pleasant/cosy, inspiring environment? Some tips: plants, not-your-boring-enteprprise-look-and-feel, open it to the nature (I want this!), design it as home, not office, provide play space (I am too into work to want to play but having a resting place for a nap is st. I’d love).

Books

Other

  • Stanford engineers build computer using carbon nanotube technology (via @RiczWest)
  • NYT: The Banality of Systemic Evil – a good article about human tendency to “obey the system” thus potentially causing evil – and thus the need to resist the system, as heroic individuals such as Snowden, Hammond, Schwartz, Manning. See the famous Eichmann in Jerusalem for how “doing your job” can create evil – “[..] what happens when people play their “proper” roles within a system, following prescribed conduct with respect to that system, while remaining blind to the moral consequences of what the system was doing — or at least compartmentalizing and ignoring those consequences.” (Tip: The book Moral Mazes explores the ethics of decision making within several corporate bureaucracies => mid-managers rules of life: (1) never go around your boss, (2) tell the boss what she wants to hear, (3) drop what she wants dropped, (4) anticipate what the boss wants so that she doesn’t need to act as a boss to get it, (5) do not report something the boss does not want reported, cover it up; the the job & keep your mouth shut.) “The bureaucracy was telling him [Snowden] to shut up and move on (in accord with the five rules in “Moral Mazes”), but Snowden felt that doing so was morally wrong.” “[..] there can be no expectation that the system will act morally of its own accord. Systems are optimized for their own survival and preventing the system from doing evil may well require breaking with organizational niceties, protocols or laws.
  • Fairphone – “A seriously cool smartphone that puts social values first” (likely the only one not built by poorly paid workers and creating too much ecological burden), for just €325. You can see detailed cost breakdown, list of suppliers, specs, and essentially everything. This is, in my opinion, super cool! Go and read the story!

Clojure Corner

  • Amazonica – “A comprehensive Clojure client for the entire Amazon AWS api.”
  • Talk Ritz, The Missing Clojure Tooling (40min, 9/2013) – thanks to this I finally understood how to use Ritz but it still seems not to work well, f.ex. setting a breakpoint always reported “Set 0 breakpoints” (lein ritz/middleware 0.7.0, nrepl-ritz.el 0.7.1); according to callen, debug-repl is simpler and nicer if you only care about local vars and evaluation. To try ritz: use M-x nrepl-ritz-jack-in, then M-x nrepl-ritz-break-on-exception, exec. f.ex. “(/ 1 0)”. In the poped-up buffer, t or enter to show frame locals, e to eval a code in the context of the frame etc. If you managed to trigger the debug buffer through a breakpoint, the actions lists would contain STEP etc. (See fun. nrepl-ritz-line-breakpoint)
  • C. Grand’s spreadmap – “library to turn Excel spreadsheets in persistent reactive associative structures” => access content via map functions; changing a value updates formula cells using it
  • Alembic Reloads your Leiningen project.clj Dependencies – add a dependency to your project.clj w/o needing to restart your REPL (just call (alembic.still/load-project), provided you have it in your lein dependencies). Limitations: cannot remove deps or change versions.
  • Defeating stack overflows – techniques for transforming mutually recursive calls etc. into something that won’t blow the stack – “Priming the pump” (memoize subresults first), core.async
  • Google Groups: Clean Architecture for Functional Programming – How do the Clean Architecture and the Clean Code best practices apply to FP (Clojure/Haskell)? Some points: OOP isn’t worse than FP, only people do class-oriented programming instead; OO better e.g. for UIs, combining them (func. core, imperative shell) can be sometimes best. Some clean arch. patterns are actually more like functions – “Interactors and Presenters, for example, do not maintain any state of their own.  Even those objects that do imply some kind of state, such as entities and gateways, keep that state hidden behind boundaries and present a functional interface instead.
  • night-vision: Handy, super light weight debugging utility – add it to your lein profile and then call (night-vision.goggles/introspect-ns! '<name of ns>) and it will print each entry/exit of a function within the scope of the namespace with the argument/return values
  • Nil Punning (Or Null Pointers Considered Not So Bad) – a great post about why nil in Clojure is not bad contrary to Java’s null (because it is actually an object, you can call functions on it, treat it as false/empty list/map/set, most core functions work on it)

Tools/Libs

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Most interesting links of August ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on August 31, 2013

Sorry folks, this month it will be very brief. I have many more great stuff in the queue but haven’t managed to write it down yet. Next month will be heavy :-)

Recommended Readings

  • Interested in native vs. webapp? Check out Why mobile web apps are slow (mobile browser much slower, not much real improvements, weak CPUs,…; seems to be really high-quality, plenty of data) and Sencha’s 5 Myths About Mobile Web Performance (Mobile web performance is mostly driven by JavaScript performance on the CPU, CPU-Bound JavaScript has only become faster because of HW improvements, Mobile browsers are already fully optimized, Future hardware improvements are unlikely to help, JavaScript garbage collection is a performance killer).
  • Why Software Projects are Terrible and How Not To Fix Them – many teams are not ready to embrace new/better software practices, primarly for two reasons: 1) most of them are nonintuitive (f.ex. adding more people will slow dev down) and need to be sold through a high hierarchy of managament – but people/managers/organizations don’t really care, it takes years for good/bad practices to have an impact, which is not relevant “now.” 2) Businss objectives change too quickly and SW is blamed for not delivering. Based on evaluating many failed projects. Conclusion: Choose carefully people/organizations your work with. Avoid blame-driven ones. Quote on middle managers: “He has to put more developers on the project, call a meeting and yell at people, and other arbitrary bad ideas.  Not because he thinks those will solve the problem.  In fact, managers often do this in spite of the fact that they know it’s bad. Because that’s what will convince upper management that they’re doing their best.” “In the vast majority of failed projects I’ve been called to looked at, the managers have not read one book on software engineering.

Data & Analytics

  • Big Data: Kafka for uSwitch’s Event Pipeline – a better alternative to log files – use LinkedIn’s Kafka for messaging, have MR jobs to import latest messages into Hadoop/HDFS. The advantage of Kafka is that it persists the messages for a period of time so it is easy to batch-import and even re-import them. The uSwitch’s talk Users As Data explains the downsides of log files. LinkedIn’s Camus is a tool for importing messages from Kafka to HDFS.
  • Realtime Analytics with Storm and Hadoop (at Twitter; presentation deck) – pre-aggregate some data into a read-only, random read DB such as ElephantDB, Voldemort, or Manhattan. For newer data use Storm and aggregated data in a read-write, big-data DB such as HBase, Riak, or Cassandra. For stuff that cannot be pre-aggregated you might use Storm’s Distributed RPC.
  • The Unified Logging Infrastructure for Data Analytics at Twitter – a paper from late 2012 that presents “Twitter’s production logging infrastructure and its evolution from application-specific logging to a uni- fied “client events” log format, where messages are captured in common, well-formatted, flexible Thrift messages” – with the benefit of “s streamlined log collection and data analysis”.

Other

  • Development and Deployment at Facebook (Kent Beck et. al., 8/2013, 13p paper) – “More than one billion users log in to Facebook at least once a month to connect and share content with each other. Among other activities, these users upload over 2.5 billion content items every day. In this article we describe the development and deployment of the software that supports all this activity, focusing on the site’s primary codebase for the Web front-end.

Talks

  • One of the most valuable talks I’ve seen, in just 18 min: The Progress Principle – about the disengagement crisis and motivation at work by Teresa Amabile at TEDx Atlanta (via @thovden). Disengagement from work is increasing, at all age and salary levels, and leads to unhappy people, low productivity, huge financial losses. Based on analysing diaries of 12k participants, the single most important engaging and motivating factor is making progress in a meaningful work (including small wins). A culture of management by fear and punishment for failure creates disengagement and can crush even an innovative, profitable, praised company in a few years. Everybody, though especially the management, creates the culture through their everyday, small actions. If everybody focuses on catalysing progress and supporting their fellow humans through good and bad times, engagement and success will follow. Remove progress inhibitors, nourish the human spirit (acknowledge what we humans value, encourage people). Yet of the managers asked, very few knew of the significance of making progress (or, I can assume, of supporting people and making them happy(er) and the impact of our inner work life (perceptions, emotions, etc.) on our productivity and creativity). The study included two seemingly similar, successfull companies, one with great engagement, another with a new management that managed to destroy the engagement and thus eventually the company. Actions to take: catalyse progress, celebrate wins, encourage and support your colleagues.

Clojure Corner

  • Wonderful Clojure Cheatsheet 1.5 with tooltips showing the doc and summary of information available at clojuredocs.org (other Clj versions), by Andy Fingerhut
  • Chas Emerick’s Clojure type selection flowchart to help you decide whether to use a map, a record, reify, proxy, gen-class, or deftype.  (Reify and proxy don’t produce a class but just an instance of an anonymous class; proxy can extend a base class, reify cannot. gen-class produces a class visible from Java and can extend Java classes.  …)

Tools/Libs

  • Docker.io – pack, ship and run any application (and its dependencies) as a lightweight container, i.e. essentially “a VM without the overhead of a VM,” using linux containers (chroot on steroids with resource limits via control groups) see reports of some uses such as Java app deployment, desktop virtualization, automatic app deployment in GitHub commit. Docker also supports evolving the containers over time, i.e. deploying new version, by pushing just diffs so it’s low-overhead. You can build a container (include files, SW, forward ports, …) using a Dockerfile. See dotScale 2013 – Solomon Hykes – Why we built Docker for an intro (20 min).
  • Packer.io – tool for building pre-configured VM images for different platforms (EC2, VirtualBox, …), remotely similar to Netflix’s Aminator. See Immutable Servers With Packer and Puppet for an example use case.
  • Ubuntu-build Vagrant boxes at cloud-images.ubuntu.com/vagrant/
  • SlimerJS – PhantomJS-compatible headless browser engine based on Firefox/Gecko (well, it is not fully headless yet but that is planned; the main focus now is full compatibility with PhantomJS’ API) (Both work with CasperJS for navigational steps/testing.)
  • localtunnel – instantly show locally running webapp/server to the rest of the world (gem install localtunnel,  localtunnel <port to share>, => share the url returned, e.g. http://xyz.localtunnel.com) – I haven’t tried it but it looks simple and very convenient
  • Logstash + Kibana (via @mortenberg): take control of your logs – while Logstash can collect (from multiple servers/services), parse (over 100 built-in patterns), store, index, search your logs, Kibana is a web interface to seach them, view them in realtime (based on a query) etc. See this Logstash slides (9/2012) and an overview of Kibana’s powers. PS: Logstash can also compute metrics and send them to graphite etc. It is typically used with ElasticSearch.
  • ncdu is an interactive, command-like disk usage browser that shows a list of directories sorted by size shown in human-friendly units, you can navigate with arrows and enter and i to show the current dir/file info, d to delete it, q to quit; check out this article about ncdu with screenshots and ncdu man page. Install via Apt etc., run f.ex. with ncdu -x / .
  • vagrant-cachier – Vagrant plugin for caching apt/yum/.. packages locally, thus speeding up destroy+up

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Most interesting links of July ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on July 31, 2013

This month focuses on languages and approaches (reactive programming, F#, Erlang, FP talks etc.), agile (need for speed, recommended books), Clojure/Linux/cloud tools and libs.

Recommended Readings

Development, agile

  • The Need For Speed – the top 10 reasons for fast development flow (with time to market being one of the less important) – more learning, focus on the MVP, focus on the puprose/goal, happier customers/leadership, better quality (sic!), higher morale (I concur!), push for cotninuous improvement, “one of the only sustainable differentiators”; => “sense of urgency and motivation”; “[..] I continue to meet people and teams that not only move very slow, they don’t understand the relationship between speed and innovation, or speed and quality.”
  • agile42 Summer Reading List 2013 – books recommanded by experienced people/agile experts – lot of interesting stuff! Topics: Communication and Coaching (f.ex. Practicing Nonviolent Communication), Business (How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow ,..),  Learning From the Military, Agile and Technology (e.g. The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results), Agile and Technology (f.ex. The people’s Scrum)
  • Dan North: Are we nearly there yet? – optimize for time to business impact; SW dev as mountaineering (impossible to estimate correctly, many unknown details, dead ends, …); go fast – but sustainable; the tyranny of backglog (there are multiple paths to the top yet backlog defines only one; have you ever considerably changed it?) “Instead we could embrace the fact that today we always know more than we did yesterday, and that tomorrow we will know even more. We can take a fresh look up the mountain every time we pause to regroup, to plan.” => we ask 1) what gives us the shortest lead time to business impact? 2) what can help us to learn/invalidate more? 3) how to assure our stakeholders we are approaching the goal?
  • Joel on Software: Software Inventory (7/2012) – a classical article about the evilness of software inventory (backlogs, issue trackers, undeployed features, …) ‘When I hear about product teams that regularly have “backlog grooming” sessions, in which they carefully waste a tiny amount of time and mental energy every day or every week thinking about every single feature which will never be implemented, I want to poke my eyes out.
  • Job satisfaction self-test: Twelve questions that define a great place to work – check yourself how satisfied you are with your job (example questions: How well do I know what is expected of me? How often in the past seven days have I received recognition or feedback on my work? How much does the mission/purpose of the company make me feel like my work is important?)
  • Coaching Anti-Patterns: Prescriptive Agile – a prescriptive coach “knows” what is “right” and forces it onto the client, without listening to her; instead, we should “Meet them where they are and leave them in a better place” => “[..] my first responsibility is to understand how and why they came to this practice. How did they come to this decision? What challenges does this approach address? What benefits are they optimizing for?” Worth remembering AND practicing :)

Languages, paradigms, approaches

  • Bacon.js Makes Functional Reactive Programming Sizzle – a nice introduction into Bacon.js that brings Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) to JavaScript and helps thus escape the callback hell. Reactive programming has been made popular by Microsoft’s Rx and recently ported to Java as RxJava by Netflix. FRP is a subtype of RP with functional concepts (map, filter, immutability, …). It provides a much cleaner way to handle multiple independent sources of events and reaction to those events, the main concepts are composable Streams of events and Properties, whose values are automatically updated based on a stream. Bacon.js Tutorial Part I : Hacking With jQuery provides a nice example of the complexity and ugly code you can run into without (F)RP even for a simple interactive web form, the Tutorial Part II: Get Started then shows the nicer Bacon.js solution.
  • The Trouble with Erlang (or Erlang is a ghetto) - an objective criticism of Erlang by somebody who seems to be quite experienced with it; as I know very little about Erlang, it was interesting to learn about its weaknesses (no map/dict data structure, slow memory management, poor “JIT,” not usable for shared-state concurrency (contrary to e.g. Clojure), immutable state is not necessary and makes some things bad, inconsistent and ugly standard lib, …)
  • Adventures in Multi Paradigm Programming – different programming paradigms/approaches re-implemented in Emacs Lisp – interesting 1) to see and compare these different approaches and 2) the flexibility of Lisp. Including iteration – Ruby’s map, Python’s list comprehension ([an_expression for x in list]), Scala’s default argument (_); search – Java’s for; arguments: direct, variadic (i.e. any number of args), named args; destructuring and pattern matching in CoffeScript/OCaml style; Haskell-like monads; objects with mixins;  namespaces.
  • Why bugs don’t like F# – no nulls, immutable data, strong type system, composition of small functions, asynchronous programming abstractions, higher-order functions over collections (no off-by-one), units of measure

Other

  • IBM high-fives Netflix open-source tools – it is interesting to see the spreading of Netflix’s open source tools for better cloud infrastructures; f.ex. “Karyon, is what Netflix calls the base container for applications and services built using the NetflixOSS ecosystem; Eureka is mid-tier load balancing; Hystrix controls interactions between myriad distributed services to nip cascading failures in the bud;  and Ribbon is a Remote Procedure Call library.”
  • ZeroMQ instead of HTTP, for internal services (with implementation in Clojure) – an interesting idea of using ZeroMQ – the sockets on steroids library – instead of HTTP in a way compatible with existing HTTP routing libs; advantages of ZeroMQ: automatic retrial (=> can restart the target service withou noticing), speed, reuse of a connection. The trick is to send a http-like structure (i.e. with method, uri, body) and pass that to Compojure or similar (update: there are now Clojure/core.async bindings for ZeroMQ)
  • Joel on Software: Victory Lap for Ask Patents – killing a bad Microsoft patent request in 15 minutes – Ask Patents is a new StackExchange site that enables experts to look at SW patent requests and point to previous existing works that invalidate them; as Joel describes in his successful patent kill story, it is not difficult at all. Hopefully this will manage to really help the patent office and hit woul-be patent trolls hard! #victory
  • The Dangers Of “Gamification” In Education by Kathy Sierra (a former game designer, a trainer of trainers at Sun, author of the Head First book series) – gamification is often regarded as something very desirable that will improve our lives; however, as Kathy discusses, it has also dark sides and, applied unappropriately, can actually decrease our intrinsic motivation (therefore it should be nearly never used in e.g. education)
  • Choosing an OSS license doesn’t need to be scary (by GitHub) – a human-readable overview of OSS licenses; you should always assign a license to your GitHub account (Add A License can help with that; otherwise it is considered to be “all rights reserved” and you are not giving back to the community (I use the same as Clojure, Eclipse Public License)

Talks

  • FunctionalTalks.org – “Brilliant people giving brilliant talks on functional programming” – f.ex. Wilkes Joiner: Functional Reactive Programming, Alexander Gounares: All your cores are belong to us, Katie Miller: Superhero monads, Bryan O’Sullivan: Running A Startup On Haskell, Rich Hickey: Introduction To Clojure, John A. De Goes: Building a Data Science Platform in Scala and many more.
  • Types vs. Tests: An Epic Battle? – “Amanda Laucher and Paul Snively debate solving problems through types and tests using different approaches.” – can type system replace tests or vice versa? Interesting intro into the discussion for me. Using F#, Scala & more. Same claims: types don’t pay out so much for “small” codebases but scale better than tests. Types – Tests is a spectrum, not two single extremes. When a property should hold “for all,” a type would be a good match. Inductive types (Scala, Haskell?) can become quite complex, dependant types (as in Coq) would be much nicer [if I got that right].
  • Paul Irish on Web Application Development Workflow (via M. Noddeland) – if you need to do some web development but are not up to date on the state of art, this might be useful – an overview of tools, utilities, services by a Googler and the person behind Modernizr, HTML5 Boilerplate, Yeoman etc. Including effective shell & dotfiles.GH, better ssh via .ssh/config and authorized_hosts, the all-in-one dev/build tool Yeoman with live reload, BrowserStack for testing, LocalTunnel to easily share anything running locally, Chrome Dev Tools support for SASS and testing devices (emulate touch events, screen sizes), JetBrains’ WebStorm, sharing tools via setapp.me. A genous idea to use GoogleAnalytics to track usage of features in a CLI app!

Other Interesting Stuff

Azul Systems’ high-performance JVM on the Vega architecture (from The Trouble with Erlang (or Erlang is a ghetto)) looks very interesting:

The other night I tweeted “If you’re looking for a language that gets multicore concurrency right, look at how Azul implemented Java on their Vega architecture” and I definitely stand by that. Azul is a company that got a lot of smart hardware and software people together and had them work on designing a custom system which would scale to hundreds of CPU cores (up to 768 of them), heaps that topped 500 GB (up to 768GB), and had the GC pause only 10-20ms at a time. The realtime performance characteristics Azul managed to eek out of their system lead them to often describe their GC as “pauseless”.

Articles:

Clojure Corner

  • Discussion: How core.async compares to agents, future and promise? – future/promise: 1 producer, 1 value, multiple consumers; agent: an unbounded queue of functions mutating a single value, with multiple producers and consumers (reading the latest value produced); channel: multiple 1:1 producers/consumers, i.e. a value can only be taken once from the channel, using a bounded queue (=> slow consumers can block fast producers). As mentioned elsewhere, channels is a relatively low-level abstraction and other things can be built on the top of it.
  • Clojure Tradeoffs (design implications and why you should care) – perhaps not very unbiased but interesting anyway :) (shared-memory over other computing paradigms, i.e. message-passing, dynamic over static, speed over convenience, composition over IoC, …)
  • Rich Hickey’s post introducing core.async with its Go-like channels as a better alternative to a collback hell (I know everybody has already read it but it is still an important link :))
  • Tools etc.
    • Faster Clojure Startup with Class Data Sharing – use JVM’s capability to include any classes in its boot image and include clojure in it
    • lein-ancient – checks for outdated dependencies and plugins => run “lein ancient :all”
    • lein-try – a Leiningen plugin that enables you to try a library in a REPL in the context of your project without having to add it to project.clj; simply run “lein try clj-time 0.5.1″ and then in the REPL “(require ‘[clj-time.core :refer :all])” and e.g. “(date-time 1986 10 14)”
    • Lemur: tool to launch a Hadoop job locally/on EMR from a job definition file + actions before/after
    • Emacs: sexp fold/expand is very useful for exploring source code (hide all but the first lines of all top-level forms with hs-hide-all) – the built-in hs-minor-mode can hide/show all, or hide/show/toggle one but the keys for it are cumbersome; hideshow-org makes it possible to toggle hide/show with TAB, while preserving the original TAB behavior (it does the normal TAB first only only if nothing changes does it expand/fold); very useful!

Tools/Libs

  • devdocs.io (via @palruud): “an all-in-one API documentation reader for [web] developers,” navigable via keyboard – JS, HTML, CSS, DOM, DOM events, jQuery, Underscore.js
  • Kilim – a message-passing framework for Java that provides ultra-lightweight threads and facilities for fast, safe, zero-copy messaging between these threads.
  • AssertJ – a library of assertions similar to fest-assert but providing a richer set of assertions (nicer API then fest-assert, according to a friend)
  • NetflixOSS – Netflix, the online streaming gigant, has open-sourced many fascinating components of its cloud infrastructure such as Karyon, a blueprint for web-ready components with many features (monitoring,…), Genie/Hadoop as a Service, Servo for monitoring, Archaius for configuration management – too many to list. Check out Chris Fregly’s fluxcapacitor, a demo distributed application that uses many of the components
  • Tools to keep a daemon running:

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Most interesting links of June ’13

Posted by Jakub Holý on June 30, 2013

Recommended Readings

Agile, process, SW dev, people etc.

  • Real Options—a Mindset – an intro into the Real Options approach, which has been quite a hot topic and a transformational way of thinking for a number of inspiring people (Dan North, Liz Keogh etc.). “Real Options help us to better make decisions and commitments with three simple principles: Options have value. Options expire. Never commit early unless you know why.” We can “pay” to keep our options open longer, i.e. to avoid commiting prematurely.
  • Demystifying the CHAOS report’s claim of ~ 1/2 features being unused: the Standish Group’s CHAOS report has been often quoted for its “finding” that a large percentage of features in applications is never/rarely used. However this claim seems to have never been confirmed, their “research” is reportedly not very scientific and not publicly available for scrutiny.  Critique by Laurent Bossavit (2013), Jorge Aranda’s Standish, the CHAOS report, and science. Thx to @smalltalk80 for pointing this out! However there is one research, Online Experimentation at Microsoft, that supports the claim, in a different context but the same problem applies to features: “Evaluating well-designed and executed experiments that were designed to improve a key metric, only about one-third were successful at improving the key metric!”
  • Why Yammer believes the traditional engineering organizational structure is dead – small teams, small projects (2-10 people, 2-10 weeks), no separation into front/middle tier/backend team (=> communication, design obstacle); have instead people specializing in these areas and construct feature teams from them based on the actual needs; engineers, not managers do eng. decisions; all aligned via focusing on the same 3 key metrics. Small projects => constant sense of urgency (and excitement): Often very long projects cause engineers to lose track of the end goal.  Think of it in terms of hiking: start fresh & excited, get tired and losing track of the goal, excited again at the end => cut out the middle part, keep them in the exciting state where they can measure progress and see it visually; it’s the only way to maintain urgency and morale. Focus: people alwasy work only at one (short) project at a time (there are special bug-fixing teams for maintenance tasks with people rotating in&out).
  • Agile development is more culture than process – Why thinking of agile as culture and not just process explains resistance and difficulty in teaching and learning the approach – and should be taught so => 1. Underscore agile values that motivate practice; 2. Identify organization values that compete with agile values, conflict of values; 3. Be sensitive to culture shock.
  • Mark Zuckerberg’s Letter to Investors: ‘The Hacker Way’ (quite long, you might want to read only “The Hacker Way” part at the end) – about Facebook’s “unique culture and management approach” – “Hackers believe that something can always be better, and that nothing is ever complete.” “Hackers try to build the best services over the long term by quickly releasing and learning from smaller iterations rather than trying to get everything right all at once.” “Instead of debating for days [..], hackers would rather just prototype something and see what works.” “Hacker culture is also extremely open and meritocratic.” “Many of our most successful products came out of hackathons, [..].” <=> five core values: Focus on Impact (focus on solving the most important problems, be good at finding the biggest problems to work on); Move Fast (“[..] if you never break anything, you’re probably not moving fast enough.”); Be Bold (“Building great things means taking risks.”); Be Open (=> effort to make as much info as possible visible to all); Build Social Value (“[..] Facebook exists to make the world more open and connected, and not just to build a company. “)
  • Dave Nicolett: I know how to tie my shoes – on the difficulty of convincing people to try unfamiliar software development techniques – “People change the way they operate when they are experiencing some sort of inconvenience or negative feedback. As long as things are going along reasonably well, people don’t go out of their way to change the way they work.” (with few exceptions) You can learn to tie your shoes in a split second, but why to invest the effort? You’d need to set aside assumptions, suppress habits, practice. You can argument there are many inconveniences (bugs, criticism for slow delivery, …) but “Unfortunately, that’s all pretty normal, and most people in the software field are accustomed to it.  They don’t see it as a problem that calls for them to change their practices. Most of them probably have a hard time visualizing a different reality.” => Maybe that’s the reason there’s been no satisfactory answer to the question of how to convince people to adopt different practices. We shouldn’t be trying to convince people to do anything. We should be helping people solve their problems and achieve their goals. If they are satisfied with the outcomes they achieve using their current methods, then there is no problem to solve.
  • Kent Beck: Pace of Progress = Pace of Feedback – ‘”The pace of my progress is completely constrained by the pace of my feedback”. If I want to go faster, it’s hard to achieve by going faster. I can almost always optimize my feedback loop, though.’ “The second lesson from this episode is that it’s not just the duration of the feedback loop that matters, it’s also the quality. All week I was working in tiny little iterations. Without producing useful information, though, those iterations could be as small or as large as I liked, I was still just going to spin my wheels.” => “The next time I seem to be going slow, I’m going to look at my whole feedback loop–duration, quality and my ability to respond to the information.
  • What Google Has Learned About How to Hire People – interview results have no relation to actual performance on the job: “We looked at tens of thousands of interviews, and everyone who had done the interviews and what they scored the candidate, and how that person ultimately performed in their job. We found zero relationship. It’s a complete random mess.” “Instead, what works well are structured behavioral interviews, where you have a consistent rubric for how you assess people, [..]” ‘Behavioral interviewing also works — where you’re not giving someone a hypothetical, but you’re starting with a question like, “Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem.”’ Link to an interesting book, Hiring Geeks That Fit.

Cool tech stuff

  • The Elixir language – Clojure + Ruby + Erlang - a functional meta-programming aware language built on top of the Erlang VM; a dynamic language with flexible syntax with macros support that leverages Erlang’s abilities to build concurrent, distributed, fault-tolerant applications with hot code upgrades. First-class support for pattern matching, polymorphism via protocols, etc. (via @bodil)
  • Random Testing seems to be gaining popularity and looks very interesting; at NDC Oslo, John Hughes has presented how QuickCheck, which generates random sequences of API calls, has been successfully used to find bugs in the Riak DB and a file system that a human would never think of, and Stuart Halloway has presented simulation testing with Simulant, which runs predefined actions according to a probabilistic model (e.g. 100 traders, each having 1h mean time between trades and mean traded amount 100, the test runs for 4 simulated hours). Something worth exploring!
  •  Dmytro Navrotskyy’s collection of Frontend Development resources and learning materials for tools (grunt, unused css detection,..), best practices (Atomic Design, …), JS/CSS frameworks, typography, animation, visualization, useful on-line services,  and many more (via Herman Schistad)
  • The Secret To 10 Million Concurrent Connections – The Kernel Is The Problem, Not The Solution: To have really fast SW, you need to implement your own core services (FS, net driver (packet handling), thread scheduling, ..) tuned for your app. You need to be aware of the clock-time cost of cache misses, memory access etc.. Custom solutions are times faster than what the general OS kernel can offer. => “data plane oriented system” Core areas and solutions for them: packet scalability, multi-core scalability (locks are expensive), memory scalability.

Other

  • M. Fowler: EmbeddedDocument – a pattern for working with JSON flowing in/out of our services (REST <-> JSON-friendly DB) without unnecessary conversions but with good encapsulation; naive approach: json -> object graph -> (processing) -> json; “In many of these situtiations a better way to proceed is to keep the data in a JSONish form, but still wrap it with objects to coordinate manipulation.” – use a lib to parse the JSON into a generic structure (e.g. a structure of lists, and maps/dicts) and store in a field of an object defining methods that encapsulate it – f.ex. for an Order we could have a method returning the customer and another computing the cost, accessing the underlying generic structure. The user of the wrapper object doesn’t need to know/care about the underlying structure. “The sweet spot for an embedded document is when you’re providing the document in the same form that you get it from the data store, but still want to do some manipulation of that data. [..] The order object needs only a constructor and a method to return its JSON representaiton. On the other hand as you do more work on the data – more server side logic, transforming into different representations – then it’s worth considering whether it’s easier to turn the data into an object graph.”
  • ThoughtWorks’ Approach To Big Data Analytics – an inspiring, brief read. Some really good points such as “It’s not about Data. It’s about Insight and Impact” => “focus on the questions you’d love to answer for your business” => “changing big data from a technological problem to a business solution.” Also “The value of data is only realised through insight. And insight is useless until it’s turned into action.” Measure the value you gain at each step. See  Introducing Agile Analytics: A Value-Driven Approach to Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing by Ken Collier
  • Wired.com, Nassim Taleb: Beware the Big Errors of ‘Big Data’ – in big data, noise has much stronger effect and in a large enough dataset we will always find spurious (i.e. false) relationships => beware! “Well, if I generate (by simulation) a set of 200 variables — completely random and totally unrelated to each other — with about 1,000 data points for each, then it would be near impossible not to find in it a certain number of “significant” correlations of sorts. But these correlations would be entirely spurious.”
  • A Taste of Salt: Like Puppet, Except It Doesn’t Suck – a deescription of Salt and the tools around by an enthusiastic user with deep experience with Puppet. Highlights: Light-weight communication over ZeroMQ, very active community, simplicity, configuration is YAML, Salt-cloud can spin instances in EC2/Openstack/…, Salt-virt does the same for virtual machines (KVM/Xen/…), Salt-vagrant, Salt-monitor (work in progess) can ask all the server for their stats. “Having stood up a number of different configuration management systems across a wide variety of environments, I’ve yet to find a solution that’s as rapid to deploy, simple to scale, or as well architected as Salt.”
  • Trash Your Servers and Burn Your Code: Immutable Infrastructure and Disposable Components – leveraging the lectures of PF to have a stable infrastructure – instead of updating servers, throw them away and create a new one from scratch (requires virtualization/cloud); this is something that Netlfix is doing and also Comoyo is moving towards
  • Robin Ward: AngularJS vs Ember – a nice overview of the different approaches of the two; the author is strongly pro-Ember, claiming that AngularJS is much closer to low-end libraris like Backbone/Knockout and that you will often need the additional features of Ember. The comments provide the right countrweight to the biased post and form thus a good whole together.
  • Scala Productivity. A Survey of the Community – people (that asnwered) seem to be productive with Scala right from the start

Non-tech

  • After Your Job Is Gone – an interesting essay on the future, which, according to the author, we can already see happening, when technology will take away most of our work and we will not need to work all day. Not very optimistic, though (the author predicts few reach and many poor people).

Clojure Corner

  • Clojure Cup 2013, Sept 28-29 – create something cool with Clojure/ClojureScript within 48h and perhaps win a price! #fun
  • Clojure use in the industry – examples at an e-mail forum – Netflix, Puppet Labs (e.g. PuppetDB), UBS (talk), Deutsche Bank (talk, some details), Citigroup (reportedly “the largest private sector deployment of Clojure to date,” 11/2012), getprismatic.com (with frontend moving to ClojureScript; -> Why Prismatic Goes Faster With Clojure), Roomkey.com (details in a Relevance podcast), MastodonC.com (big data), Trend Micro, Walmart, beanstalkapp.com, ReadyForZero.com (50kLoC),  www.cognician.com (20kLoC), World Singles (13kLoC) and more… (another similar thread)
  • Stuart Sierra’s My Clojure Workflow, Reloaded (6/2013) – mainly about reloading changes into REPL, working around things that are not reloaded/left over => restart the app from scratch after significant changes => the app as a transient object => no global state, careful management of resources, :dev profile with :source-paths to a dir with user.clj (autoloaded by repl, pre-loading useful stuff) and dev util deps
  • Adam Bard’s walk-through useful Clojure libs – f.ex. clojure.[data.[csv xml json] inspector java.shell java.browse xml], tools.logging, clojure.core.[match logic typed contracts ...]
  • Juxt.pro: Jon Pither’s and Malcolm Sparks’ “network of experienced IT professionals who specialise in the Clojure programming language,” providing training, consulting, talks
  • Anthony Grimes: The Clojure Community and Me (2011) – an exciting insight into the embracing and supportive Clojure community
  • In Clojure-based Machine Learning: “Our backend is 99.4% coded in Clojure, and 66% of the team [of 3] had never programmed seriously in any Lisp, let alone Haskell or Prolog (heck, not even I (the remaining 33%) had actually tried anything non-mainstream for real in a big project!) Maybe some Ruby, and lots and lots of Java and C and C++. But they accepted the challenge after reading around and learning the basics, and 3 months later you couldn’t take Clojure from their prying hands.”
  • J. Pither: TDD and Clojure – “If you were to create a shopping list of things you really want for your development experience then what would you put at the top?” => 1. rapid feedback on changes, 2. REPL (place to explore and to play with your code <=> TDD), 3. FP and Immutability (“FP and dynamic languages lead to a lot less code. There’s less ceremony, less modeling. Because you’re managing less code you do less large scale refactorings.” => TDD needed less), 4. Regression Tests (“It’s my current opinion that what you get left out of TDD once you have amazingly fast feedback and a REPL is regression testing.”)

Tools/Libs

Tools

  • More beautiful and colorful git log, by Filipe Kiss (via @lcdutoit) You may also want to have a look at tig, which is a text-based UI for git with the default view similar to git log.
  • jq (via lcdutoit) – sed/awk/grep for JSON – slice, filter, map, transform structured data
  • SemanticMerge (Windows) – a Java-aware merge tool – free beta (I haven’t tried it)

Libs

  • JetLang – a high performance java threading library for in-memory messaging, based upon Retlang (via @tastapod, used likely in a trading SW).

Favorite Quotes

Agile [is] in NOT a process — it’s a philosophy.

- Joe Wroblewski in a comment to a blog post

Teach culture first, then process and techniques

- Jeff Patton in Agile development is more culture than process

If a candidate came telling me that s/he wanted to program only in, say, Java because that’s what s/he knows best and that s/he doesn’t really feel prepared or interested in learning and using, say, Clojure (or any other language, really), I wouldn’t hire her/him in a million years, no matter what language my project were using, and no matter how many thousands of candidates like this one I had at my disposal.
- José Antonio Ortega in Clojure-based Machine Learning

We shouldn’t be trying to convince people to do anything. We should be helping people solve their problems and achieve their goals. If they are satisfied with the outcomes they achieve using their current methods, then there is no problem to solve.
- Dave Nicolett in I know how to tie my shoes

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Installing Latest Node.JS And NPM Modules With Puppet

Posted by Jakub Holý on June 21, 2013

PuppetLabs’ nodejs module is unfortunately quite out of date, providing Node.js 0.6, however there is a simple way to get the latest Node:

  1. Install the puppetlabs-apt module
  2. Add ppa:chris-lea/node.js to apt
  3. Install nodejs
  4. Steal the npm provider from the puppetlabs-nodejs module
  5. Install a npm module

Code:

Read the rest of this entry »

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